Susannah Clapp

Susannah Clapp is a critic with The Observer UK. This account has been auto-generated, and does not indicate that this person is an active member of Show-Score.com. That said, if you "follow" this member, you will automatically be updated whenever s/he writes a new review.

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Reviews (15)
The Guardian (UK)

“Electric staging...Hall’s adaptation...makes this look like a prescient, urgent text...van Hove’s production dazzlingly evokes both fake news and reality television...There are weaknesses. A romantic subplot is feeble: despite the nice work of Dockery and Henshall...Cranston is hugely impressive as he skims from fragile to dangerous, sincere to sceptical, palely haunted to passionately possessed.” Full Review

The Emperor
Brooklyn
The Guardian (UK)

for a previous production “Teevan has written a version in which an entire country is conjured up by only two performers...This could easily have become a tedious tour de force. Hunter helps to prevent that with her particular mixture of gravity and irony...The tremendous musician Zeleke is on stage throughout, sometimes singing, sometimes sending out ripples of notes like a wind...It looks levelly at the allure of a man who introduced electricity to Ethiopia.” Full Review

The Guardian (UK)

for a previous production "This family show mixes carnival and tragedy in a series of mash-ups, both merry and sad...The register shifts from poignant reunions to cartoon episodes...'War Horse' has given the combination of puppetry and Michael Morpurgo a powerful theatrical pedigree. '946' does not have the same steamroller power. Yet alongside its musical bounce it lands a strong argument...The stage is full of characters who should make audiences think again about the word 'migrant.'" Full Review

Yerma
Upper E Side
The Guardian (UK)

for a previous production "Stone shows the yearning of the central figure, the pressure that builds up around her, and the desperation that engulfs her, as utterly contemporary...It would have been so easy for this reimagining to be glib. It is not...Crucial to the production’s triumph are its manoeuvres in and out of naturalism. This is loyal to Lorca. Though the speech is totally secular and 21st-century, the drama has a liturgical movement. It is a requiem for lost hope." Full Review

Escaped Alone
Brooklyn
The Guardian (UK)

for a previous production “This is fantasy intricately wired into current politics. It is intimate and vast. Domestic and wild. And it is a consequence of the marvelous, long-standing collaboration between Churchill and director James Macdonald...It is magnificent Bassett, one of our greatest and least anointed actors, who is the queenpin of the action…And she is bringing us the truth. This is a play that remakes the idea of authority." Full Review

The Guardian (UK)

for a previous production "They will be hard put to match the grisly glory of Bill Buckhurst’s staging...One of the most heartening theatrical stories of the past year, the production proves the importance of visionary producers...Jeremy Secomb and Siobhan McCarthy are particularly strong as Todd and Mrs Lovett, he with his tombstone face and she sinisterly romping. Each slit throat is announced by red light washing across the stage. A background sizzle announces that the ovens are alight." Full Review

The Guardian (UK)

for a previous production "Benedict Andrews's version steams off the stage with pain, excitement and clamour...Andrews's main interventions here are visual, taking you into the core of the play...The evening belongs to Anderson, who makes each phase of the DuBois disintegration her own...Her collapse is spectacular: a terror of blotched lipstick and flying petticoats. Her departure is a masterclass in how to make audiences weep." Full Review

The Mousetrap
Seven Dials
The Guardian (UK)

“’The Mousetrap’ provides what a theatre museum cannot...A piece of stage life lifted wholesale from the past, a piece that carries the DNA of the first performance, that has not been re-created but continuously re-enacted. Some of what is seen is the stuffiness that gives the overmaligned 50s a bad name...What makes it still enjoyable, for all the creaks, are Christie's puzzle plotting, the soothing certainty of resolution, and one surprise that is never mentioned.” Full Review

The Guardian (UK)

“’The Ferryman' is profligate, boisterous, far-reaching...It could so easily have been corny, this wild parade of Irish characters, dancing, telling stories and recruiting for the IRA. In fact, Butterworth makes skittles out of the near-stereotypes with caustic comedy...This is a cast without weak links. Considine, making his stage debut...is completely controlled and completely disturbed. Donnelly is fiery and desolate...Glynn-Carney is extraordinary.” Full Review

Burning Doors
East Village
The Guardian (UK)

for a previous production “There is more expression than information on offer; I longed for some explanation and history. And yet there are magnetic moments: terrifying and haunting and sometimes wordless. As when a woman is bungeed high up above the stage stretched out like a starfish…Or when, at the end, a single lightbulb is swung around the stage amid darkness. A good deed in a naughty world.” Full Review

The Guardian (UK)

for a previous production "Andy Karl is strong in the role...He has the great help of Minchin’s lyrics, which are some of the best around: spry, disconcerting, acerbically rhymed, though over-amplification means they can’t always be heard...Yet for all the ingenuity, the core of the evening is cautious and familiar...The numbers sound as if they might have been put out by the local radio station...The difficulty is not so much that none of the tunes are memorable: not one is disturbing." Full Review

Cyprus Avenue
East Village
The Guardian (UK)

for a previous production "Ireland’s new play combines horror and humour and thought in bone-shaking proportions. Featherstone’s production is taut. I can’t remember when I saw a play that was so utterly clear yet had such a startling destination. I don’t think I’ve ever seen one so forcefully propelled by a comic idea...Rea is quiet, furrowed, patient, perfectly controlled...It ends with terrifying violence...Terrifying because it is logically prepared for and yet totally unexpected." Full Review

Henry V (BAM)
Brooklyn
The Guardian (UK)

for a previous production "There is a kind of conjuring in Gregory Doran’s production of 'Henry V'...Doran’s production is robust and clear and avoids triumphalism while staying clear of any specifically anti-war interpretation. Alex Hassell is a restrained, cautious Henry, not easily given to rhetoric...This psychological uncertainty is appealing; less so the lack of certainty in his voice, which early on muffles the verse." Full Review

Golem
Upper W Side
The Guardian (UK)

for a previous production "‘Golem’ amply bears out the promise of the earlier shows, with additional technical expertise…The ingenuity is exemplary: yet this is my least favourite of 1927’s shows. Its message, though sympathetic, is too insistent. Still, I have set a high bar here. This is a glimmering evening; anyone interested in the theatre must attend." Full Review

Skylight
Midtown W
The Guardian (UK)

for a previous production "For nearly 20 years, I have been arguing with Skylight. Last week I was won over. Stephen Daldry's production is a debate that dances, a high-velocity encounter between two exceptional actors. It convinced me that this is a pivotal play." Full Review