Theresa Basile

Theresa Basile is a critic with Manhattan With a Twist. This account has been auto-generated, and does not indicate that this person is an active member of Show-Score.com. That said, if you "follow" this member, you will automatically be updated whenever s/he writes a new review.

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Reviews (8)
Manhattan With a Twist

"What could be a gimmick in the hands of less thoughtful directors than Phoebe Brooks is instead a powerful statement...'Measure for Measure’s' 90-minute cut, while impressive in the way it edited the story into the essentials, it left little room for its best moments to breathe despite the strength of the cast...Both productions, however, are important contributions to the conversation about how the world treats female and nonbinary sexes and genders as inherently sinful." Full Review

Wickedest Woman
Upper W Side
Manhattan With a Twist

"Jessica O’Hara Baker gives a fierce, intense performance that carries the show. She’s electrifying to watch, and her presence is missed in the few moments she’s offstage for a costume change...The production is thoughtfully directed by Melissa Crespo...'Wickedest Woman' is a play worth braving the cold weather for, to see the story of an exceptional woman whose modern relevance is, at once, depressing and inspiring." Full Review

Manhattan With a Twist

"'Bernie and Mikey’s Trip to the Moon' reminds us of the importance of letting actors with disabilities play disabled characters. Having Stephanie Gould play Bernie and Benjamin Rosloff (an actor on the autism spectrum) play Jeff, Bernie’s persistent suitor, leaves no room for caricature or stereotypes. The play, from the writing to the direction to the performances, treats people with disabilities respectfully without preaching from a pulpit...Important and moving show." Full Review

Manhattan With a Twist

A play that goes into great detail about its description of a setting while taking place entirely within a man’s living room shouldn’t work so well, but it does...Written with great affection and care, ‘The Pattern at Pendarvis’ is a play whose effect sneaks up on you slowly. At first, it seems like a pleasant enough way to spend eighty minutes, but it gradually becomes something special, and concludes with a beautifully understated ending that respects the nuance that came before.” Full Review

Manhattan With a Twist

"The cast is strong in both productions, easily adapting to Shakespeare’s language in 'Measure' and convincingly playing high school students in 'The Virtuous Fall.' All of the performers hinted at the rich inner lives of their characters...'The Virtuous Fall' is the stronger production partially by virtue of being longer...Both productions, however, are important contributions to the conversation about how the world treats female and nonbinary sexes and genders as inherently sinful." Full Review

Life x3
Chelsea
Manhattan With a Twist

“We see three versions of the same evening play out...The character interactions are fascinating to watch as their personalities bounce off of each other, manifesting in different ways depending on the external factors of the night. The cast is uniformly strong...Each version of the night leaves us at the edge of our seats, wondering how and if everything will fall apart...A thrilling way to spend an evening.” Full Review

My Life on a Diet
Midtown W
Manhattan With a Twist

"The show is about much more than eating habits. Taylor’s anecdotes about her family and colleagues in the entertainment industry reveal more than eighty years of interactions with larger-than-life people, Taylor herself included. Occasionally, these anecdotes are slightly meandering and seem to lose the plot, but sometimes they’re the best part of the show...Taylor imbues each one of her ‘characters’ with this humanity, and the result is a lovely way to spend time with the performer." Full Review

Manhattan With a Twist

“An ambitious play, exploring multiple layers of different relationships...capturing essential elements of the college experience in a way that leaves the audience feeling as though they’ve been transported back...The last scene...feels a bit abrupt, as though the play doesn’t quite know how to end. Perhaps this is intentional to show how little of life can be resolved after two months of college...Beautifully crafted characters portrayed by a universally strong cast. I was left wanting more.” Full Review