Thom Geier

Thom Geier is a critic with Entertainment Weekly. This account has been auto-generated, and does not indicate that this person is an active member of Show-Score.com. That said, if you "follow" this member, you will automatically be updated whenever s/he writes a new review.

If you are this critic, please see the instructions on how to add reviews, update your profile, or make changes to your excerpts and scores.

Reviews (83)
Seven Deadly Sins
West Village
The Wrap

"The brevity of the plays — all clocking in under 15 minutes — can be constraining. Some have O. Henry-like twists that you can spot from the next block, while others would work more plausibly if they had more running time to play out." Full Review

Little Women
West Village
The Wrap

“Hamill’s new adaptation...shows a flair for turning a doorstop of a novel into a relatively fleet theatrical entertainment. But...you can feel the lightweightness of the material, which is further emphasized by the broadness of Lapine’s direction..Purists will be surprised by other departures in plot and characterization from Alcott’s original text...There are moments of pure theatrical delight...At its best (and worst), ‘Little Women’ plays like children’s theater for the NPR crowd.” Full Review

Continuity
Midtown W
The Wrap

“Thoughtful and hilarious...Wohl continually manages to upend our expectations — both about the movie-within-a-play and about the dynamics among these classic Hollywood ‘types’...Chavkin directs ‘Continuity’ with a fine balance between artificiality and realism, consistent with Wohl’s script — which has iceberg-like depths beneath all its surface pleasures.” Full Review

Mac Beth
Upper E Side
The Wrap

for a previous production "Full of a whole lot of sound but precious little fury...Director Erica Schmidt explores some interesting ideas in her adaptation...But as a director, she’s produced a loud, exasperating muddle...The performances here are so spastic, the line delivery so rapid-fire that not only is Shakespeare’s poetry lost but also any sense that these are flesh-and-blood adolescents who have deliberately chosen to act out this ancient play in some grassy field." Full Review

The Wrap

"Terry Kinney begins his solid revival of the 1978 Sam Shepard drama with a jolting coup de theatre...But aside from the onstage appearance of an adorable, scene-stealing lamb, the rest of Kinney’s production never quite matches the shock of its opening moments...There’s not a great deal of subtlety here, either in the performances or in Shepard’s often on-the-nose metaphors. As a result, the reversals of plot and character in the last act fail to deliver the impact they deserve." Full Review

The Wrap

“Chavkin, her production team and cast are working at the top of their form — and they go a long way to masking some of the show’s shortcomings. Mitchell is a better composer than a lyricist, alas, and sometimes leans too heavily on De Shields’ narration...The fact remains that there’s just not much story here...Still, there is something refreshing about a new musical that nods to the past even as it presents stage images and melodies that seem entirely fresh and new.” Full Review

The Wrap

"Fish has stripped down this chestnut of the American musical theater to its barest, rawest elements...Fish’s biggest innovation is to pull back the set pieces and put the turn-of-the-20th-century characters — and their many contradictions — center stage...Not all of Fish’s gambits entirely work...His most radical departure from Hammerstein’s script comes in the finale...The scene is a transfixing coup de theatre, but it doesn’t feel entirely earned." Full Review

The Wrap

"A show that seems to be ripped from the headlines...Shreck jumps between embodying her teenage self and a modern fortysomething in the era of Trump. It’s the latter who’s able to reflect on her accumulated knowledge of both her family history and her more grown-up understanding of American history...Schreck is an engaging storyteller with a delivery that seems improvised even when she is sticking to her winding but always-focused script." Full Review

Boesman and Lena
Midtown W
The Wrap

"In director Yaël Farber’s deliberately discomfiting new revival the drama plays less as history than as allegory...Jah and Ngaujah are fully committed to these roles, and they don’t let anyone off the hook — not each other and not the audience, whom they stare down at several points in the intermission-less production, even during the curtain call." Full Review

Mies Julie
East Village
The Wrap

"'Mies Julie' makes a strong case for Strindberg’s enduring relevance — despite a tragically uneven production under Shariffa Ali’s direction...One shortcoming of Farber’s 75-minute, intermissionless staging is that doesn’t allow either the cast or theatergoers a break to absorb the shifting power dynamics between the central couple...But her approach breathes new life into a story whose conflicts and power dynamics can seem anachronistic and even dated." Full Review

About Alice
Brooklyn
The Wrap

“A slender but thoughtful look at the writer’s beloved wife and muse…A one-man memory play, with occasional interjections from the subject of that one man’s memory…Thankfully, the two stars suggest a fuller, rounded life than seems to exist on the page…Despite its 75-minute running time, ‘About Alice’ can seem a little saggy at times. But for the most part, it’s a wry and rueful tribute to a remarkable woman.” Full Review

The Wrap

“This musical version of...’Clueless’ is mostly just whack...Heckerling goes the jukebox musical route...While some of the tunes are played pretty much straight, most have had their lyrics radically reworked to fit into Heckerling’s storyline...The best of the new songs are cute, if random...But others come off as embarrassingly amateurish...All the elements that made Heckerling’s movie groundbreaking...here is watered down into the most generic of musical theater adaptations.” Full Review

The Jungle
Brooklyn
The Wrap

“The refugee crisis can seem like an abstract, far-off issue. But ‘The Jungle’ drops us smack in the center of a camp of asylum-seekers — with all its slapdash infrastructure, clash of cultures and pulsing humanity...Intermingling moments of conflict and horror with lighter moments of warmth, music and laughter...That rarest of theatrical experiences. It makes us think, it makes us feel, and it challenges us to find the human faces in the masses of images we see on newscasts.” Full Review

The Wrap

"Don’t let Birbiglia’s Build-a-Bear physique, schlubby uniform (khakis and ill-fitting casual shirt) or milquetoasted voice fool you. Or maybe do — because his very relatability allows him to get away with surprisingly sharp-edged humor about some very serious subjects...He is the sort of guy who sticks around, even when things get a little rough. Maybe because he’s able to laugh at the situation — and make everyone else laugh, too." Full Review

Eve's Song
East Village
The Wrap

"This is a play that grapples with racial injustice...Lloyd’s play works most strongly when it filters those Big Ideas through a more personal lens...Bonney’s production smooths over many of the play’s rougher edges, including the more abrupt gear-shifts in tone and sensibility...'Eve’s Song' can’t comfortably contain all of those jarring elements in such a slender frame. But Lloyd demonstrates that hers is a voice worth hearing.” Full Review

Good Grief
Gramercy
The Wrap

"Each is uncomprehending of just how stuck Nkechi seems to be over MJ’s death...The play doesn’t shed much light on this question — nor does it gather much in the way of narrative momentum over the course of its running time. And occasional efforts to elevate the material to the mythic seem like too big a stretch for what amounts to a slight, if well-observed story of loss....But there is much to admire here, particularly in Anyanwu’s gift for dialogue." Full Review

Sakina’s Restaurant
West Village
The Wrap

"The Mumbai-born performer seamlessly transitions into a half dozen different characters before our eyes, giving each a unique posture and vocal inflection that summons their individual personalities...It’s tour-de-force acting...It’s a pity that Mandvi’s script...doesn’t quite match the depth and dramatic power of his performance...Since Mandvi’s confident performance smooths over many of the rough edges of his script, 'Sakina’s Restaurant' delivers a mostly satisfying meal." Full Review

Stars in the Night
Midtown W
The Wrap

"The show seems to blur the lines between traditional theater acting that projects out to the audience and the more subtle demands of cinematic performance where the camera can pick up even the subtlest flickers of emotion as they glance across the face...The earlier scenes are diverting enough, to be sure, as you puzzle out how these characters might connect to each other — but on their own, none come close to delivering the impact of those final scenes." Full Review

The Wrap

"An elaborately staged new production that presents Lieber and Stoller’s tunes that wallows in nostalgia and old-fashioned showmanship...A talented cast segues from song to song without pausing for dialogue, and restrict dramatization to the characters in the songs themselves...It’s an enjoyable showcase of classic rock-pop tunes that seldom really lets loose...Bergasse & Co. also color within the lines in other ways too, invoking a nostalgia that probably seemed dated even in 1995." Full Review

The Wrap

“A lush and romantic score...Matched by the athletic and sometimes sexy dancing of Tony Yazbeck and Irina Dvorovenko...Stanton’s lighting is a revelation, adding new layers of meaning and heightening key moments...But for all the stunning visuals and the spirited and balletic movement of the talented cast, ‘The Beast in the Jungle’ remains steadily earthbound when it comes to David Thompson’s book.” Full Review

The Wrap

"Guirgis demonstrates a flare for firecracker dialogue that grabs our interest and underscores his beaten-down urban characters’ capacity for hair-trigger outbursts of anger and despair...Rashad keeps most of the scenes tethered to a kind of heightened reality, allowing her uniformly talented cast to dig into the juicier disses...While the episodic nature of the play never grows tedious, it also never manages to gather much in the way of narrative momentum." Full Review

Travesties
Midtown W
The Wrap

"A spirited, quick-paced revival...There is quick-witted wordplay...an entire scene written in limerick form; a delightful music-hall-style duet of one-up-manship...Under Marber's masterful direction, 'Travesties' never lets the mayhem swirl completely out of control. At the center of the madness is a bravura performance by Hollander...Marber's staging really shines when it slows down the verbal pyrotechnics to explore the efficacy of art in challenging times." Full Review

The Wrap

"She brings a refreshing vulnerability to Dolly Levi — a word that you could never put in the same sentence with Bette Midler. In Peters’ hands, the Act 1 show-stopper 'Before the Parade Passes By' begins as a heart-tugging almost introspective cri de coeur until she builds up the courage to take on the world...Peters is well-matched with Victor Garber...But the real standout in this production is Charlie Stemp...Stemp virtually steals the show." Full Review

The Wrap

"Well-intentioned but ill-proportioned...He’s gotten it to a good-as-it’s-gonna-get place. But this modest celebration of the joys of storytelling, which opened Thursday, is at its heart a chamber piece that feels woefully out of place in a Broadway theater...This is the sort of performance that would play better in the Lithgow family living room, or even in a televised version in your TV room at home." Full Review

Mankind
Midtown W
The Wrap

"An overlong exploration of toxic masculinity and a battle cry for women’s rights that suffers from an even more glaring shortcoming: an all-male cast...The polish of the production alas, also helps to underscore how undercooked the script sometimes is...It doesn’t help that O’Hara has opted to direct his own material...A different director might have helped this prodigiously talented writer to hone his material into a tighter, sharper edge." Full Review

The Wrap

“Leon has delivered a modern-dress version of a Shakespeare classic that retains all of the Bard’s poetry and, in this case, comic brio...The modern touches never feel forced...This show remains relevant...What makes Leon’s ‘Much Ado About Nothing’ sing is that it remains exceeding wise, thoughtful in its updating of the Bard while never losing sight of the show’s genuine comedic heart. And at its center, there is that star-making, sharp-tongued turn by the radiant Danielle Brooks.” Full Review

The Wrap

"Director Arin Arbus, working with intimacy and fight director Claire Warden, thoughtfully reconsiders what this seemingly mismatched, middle-aged 1980s couple has to teach us in the #MeToo era...McDonald proves again why she is perhaps her generation’s finest actress...McNally’s hopeful and heartfelt dramedy still carries a message for audiences who have grown perhaps even more jaded about love than those of three decades ago." Full Review

Octet
Midtown W
The Wrap

"This is a deliberately secular spin on a choral tradition that’s more typically heard in a religious setting, but the approach helps elevate the seriousness with which Malloy approaches his themes...However, there is a certain sameness that creeps into the individual songs...Still, 'Octet' is a thoughtful and thought-provoking exercise, directed with theatrical flourish by Annie Tippe and performed with consummate craft and musicianship by the eight-member cast." Full Review

Happy Talk
Midtown W
The Wrap

"Uneven new dramedy...Eisenberg’s script is often funny, and he gets much mileage out of Lorraine’s verbal barbs. But despite the hard work of a talented cast — Ireland in particular seems to be having a blast — director Scott Elliott’s production can’t overcome the one-dimensionality of the characters, or the creakiness of the plot." Full Review

High Button Shoes
Midtown W
The Wrap

“The ‘Bathing Beauty Ballet’ near the top of Act 2 of ‘High Button Shoes’, a classic 1947 musical comedy that opened...as part of NY City Center’s Encores! revival series, is indeed a show-stopper, choreographed to well-timed perfection...Would that the rest of the production had such verve — because it would help to paper over a show that’s about as substantial as cotton candy, dissipating almost the moment you taste it...The thin plot is supplemented by vaudeville-ish side bits.” Full Review

The Wrap

"Tatiana Mallarino’s clever staging and Phillips’ low-fi set design, which converts a horizontal light bar into everything from a train to a plane to various neon-lit interrogation rooms, lend a greater degree of theatricality to the proceedings. The souped-up production can only do so much, though: Despite the 90-minute running time, you may find yourself counting down just how many more crossings there are still to go before the final curtain." Full Review

The Wrap

"Even in the throes of dementia later in the show, Jackson’s Lear shows no wasted movement, no overly dramatic flourishes. Would that Gold’s production had showed a similar resolve...Gold is more successful by casting Ruth Wilson as both Cordelia and the Fool...Gold’s listless production keeps dragging just when it should be gaining momentum...Only Jackson herself pierces through the unnecessary distractions of this production." Full Review

Fleabag
Soho/Tribeca
The Wrap

"A sensational and spirited revival...What centers Waller-Bridge’s show is not only her razor-sharp wit, and her gift for narrative and comedic surprise, but also her performance...and she maintains a presence on stage that is rivetingly authentic...Vicky Jones directs with well-timed precision...For fans of the TV series, it’s fun to see how certain characters exist only in the periphery in the stage version...Both versions work. Brilliantly." Full Review

The Wrap

"Forbes’ production manages to exacerbate this over-long show’s weaknesses...What Nottage has written as satire instead comes off as farce, and scenes meant to send up both outdated performance styles and modern-day academics turn them into broad caricatures...’Vera Stark’ has some timely things to say about the challenges facing black artists — but it presents a tonal challenge to even the most talented companies that this production can’t quite meet.” Full Review

The Dance of Death
East Village
The Wrap

"McPherson has adapted Strindberg’s play in plain-spoken English which makes the most of the play’s barbed Scandinavian wit. But the challenge for director Victoria Clark is the same that has plagued all who tackle this tricky story: Do you play it for tragedy or comedy, melodrama or farce?...Clark’s cast leans toward naturalism. This deprives the play of some of its comedic power...Despite their best efforts, Clark and her talented cast aren’t able to resolve this play’s many contradictions." Full Review

The Wrap

"It’s a risk to cast adult actors as young children, but here the gambit works. While purists may be driven to distraction by all the tweaks, Sorkin’s reworking of Lee’s plot frequently lets us cast a fresh eye on a familiar story we remember well from school...Where Sorkin succeeds is in getting us to rethink an American classic without any fussiness or archness. Director Bartlett Sher strikes the right balance between the epic and the intimate." Full Review

The Wrap

"Nottage crafts a satirical, punchline-heavy riches-to-rags story that plays like the opening episodes to a network comedy — one that would not feel out of place following a Tyler Perry jam...Director Lileana Blain-Cruz keeps all of Nottage’s comic balls in the air, swiftly changing scenes as the eight-person cast take on multiple roles...In the end, though, 'Fabulation' feels both slight and abbreviated, like the pilot for a promising but canceled-too-soon series." Full Review

Slave Play
East Village
The Wrap

"A giant trigger warning in three acts...An ambitious, at times uneven satire about race and sex and power and politics that seems designed to provoke...’Slave Play’ can be saggy; each of the three acts would benefit from some trimming...At no point do we believe that these are flesh-and-blood humans; they seem more like props for Harris’ provocative message about the dreadful state of race relations,..’Slave Play’ announces the arrival of a bold and challenging new voice in theater.” Full Review

The Wrap

"A thrilling revival...The stop-and-start storytelling alternates from the wry to the absurd to the profound, like some kind of existential stand-up act...Hall commands the stage just as he did when he played the M.C. in Broadway’s 'Cabaret,' especially when he leaves the stage to wander into the audience, asking questions without actually waiting for (or expecting) answers." Full Review

The Wrap

"Director Kenny Leon keeps the action taut during the 90-minute running time, perhaps too taut. There isn’t much breathing room in the production...This is the rare show that would benefit from a longer running time, from more scenes exploring the characters in greater depth...Despite the best efforts of his talented cast, too often the characters can seem like mouthpieces for different points of view in a plot jerry-rigged in ways that don’t always ring true." Full Review

Gloria: A Life
Gramercy
The Wrap

"Mann’s well-crafted play — which is equal parts biography, history lesson, TED talk and call to action — encourages just the sort of cathartic engagement that was on display with audience members...The show’s real power, though, comes in Steinem’s — and Lahti’s — ability to give voice to the deep-seated feelings of powerlessness and frustration and exploitation that many women feel — and to channel those feelings into meaningful action." Full Review

The Wrap

"Fish has stripped down Rodgers and Hammerstein’s 1943 classic to its barest, rawest elements...Fish’s biggest innovation is to pull back the set pieces and put the turn-of-the-20th-century characters — and their many contradictions — center stage...As with many a reimagining of a classic, not all of Fish’s gambits entirely work. His most radical departure from Oscar Hammerstein’s script comes in the finale...The scene is a transfixing coup de theatre, but it doesn’t feel earned." Full Review

The Wrap

“There’s much to admire in the new pared-down musical version of ‘Twelfth Night’...The conventions of American musical theater allow co-conceivers Kwei-Armah and Taub to streamline parallel characters and storylines into multi-verse songs that don’t overstay their welcome...Finds a clever use for its plus-size ensemble...And while there’s a certain sameness to the score — there are no outright clunkers either." Full Review

The Wrap

"Iwuji is ultimately upstaged by a truly brilliant performance by Corey Stoll as the duplicitous Iago...Stoll also brings an admirable plain-spokenness to his lines, which are delivered with a conversational brio that makes the audience even more complicit in his murderous schemes. But Stoll is not the only standout on stage...Director Ruben Santiago-Hudson’s production is a revelation, galloping through three hours of drama without ever getting bogged down in exposition or stuffiness." Full Review

The Wrap

“End of life crises have seldom seemed so endless...Thorne has a fine ear for dialogue, deeply attuned to the way family members can nurse resentments and pick at each other’s scabs to deflect from any self-reflection...But Thorne also weighs down her drama with a lot of circuitous plotting and didactic exposition about the nature of hospice care...We are left without the climactic family confrontation or catharsis for which we’ve been bracing.” Full Review

Paradise Blue
Midtown W
The Wrap

"If the characters and set-up sound a little stock, Morisseau manages to elevate them with some pointed commentary and poetic turns of phrase. Her writing consistently elevates material that might otherwise seem pat...Ruben Santiago-Hudson stages the action, including the musical interludes, with a sure and steady hand — building to a climax that is suitably surprising even if it does not quite feel earned." Full Review

Rocktopia
Midtown W
The Wrap

"A misbegotten new concert mashup...The very concept feels so dated...Fleischer and Evan stick mostly to obvious choices...Some of Fleischer's mashups don't really work...The upstage LED screens...offer the silliest and most on-the-nose visuals imaginable...The singers are mostly solid, and there are some genuine highlights...But on the whole, this is one classical-rock collaboration that would have more than just Beethoven rolling over." Full Review

The Wrap

"An elegiac wisp of a memory play...As in most of Kennedy's work, naturalism is eschewed in favor of a more roundabout form of exposition...Mood is given primacy over plot...Canfield and Pecinka bring a sense of flirtatious playfulness to their roles at times - and then pivot skillfully to the weightier themes...Yionoulis gives this slight show a lavish physical production...This 'Box' deserves to be unpacked - in every sense - on a stage." Full Review

Disco Pigs
Chelsea
The Wrap

“Campbell is like an Energizer bunny of kinetic energy, running and dancing about...Lynch, meanwhile, brings some of the mooniness she displayed playing Luna Lovegood on the big screen...Haidar keeps his stars in almost constant motion, often to the beat of mid-’90s pop tunes. The strategy is an effective one, bringing ‘Disco Pigs’ in at a fleet 75 minutes and helping disguise some of the shortcomings of Walsh’s early and promising script.” Full Review

The Wrap

"Guirgis has written an issue play, with a capital 'I'...And he’s built it on the back of some rat-a-tat dialogue and exchanges of ideas that continually reveal the capacity to surprise...It’s in those Sorkin-like exchanges that dance around Big Ideas without ever settling on even Medium-Size Conclusions, that Guirgis‘ work shines...'Jesus Hopped the ‘A’ Train' still packs a punch." Full Review