Tim Bano

Tim Bano is a critic with Fest (UK). This account has been auto-generated, and does not indicate that this person is an active member of Show-Score.com. That said, if you "follow" this member, you will automatically be updated whenever s/he writes a new review.

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Reviews (68)
The Stage (UK)

Despite the show’s creative pedigree, with Mamma Mia! director Phyllida Lloyd at the helm and a book by The Mountain-top writer Katori Hall, nothing about the production is particularly interesting or innovative. It’s a standard bio-musical... Full Review

The Stage (UK)

Herrin is keen not to turn memory into something beautiful and elegiac, but restrained and uncomfortable instead. Sometimes it just feels off-pitch, aiming for a high note it doesn’t quite reach. Full Review

Oklahoma! (London)
Southwark
The Stage (UK)

It’s Oklahoma! with a snarl, disassembled and put back together with deep suspicion. The production succeeds, really, in a number of stunning sequences and images rather than as a whole. This isn’t simply dusting off a classic or giving it a spit and polish, it’s a complete dismantling of the show. Full Review

The Stage (UK)

Cooke is aware of the play’s faults and is content to examine rather than erase them, but the greatest strength here is that he finds the play’s missing heart. Full Review

The Stage (UK)

Worth the drama? Worth the wait? The jury’s out...Sorkin’s approach is the kind you can swoon or sicken at. It assumes that we’re all a bit older than when we first encountered the book, a bit more able to hold on to complexity. Full Review

The Stage (UK)

It’s a shell of a show, all noise and no signal, instantly crumbling into its own lack of substance. Full Review

The Stage (UK)

This is the spiritual successor to War Horse. It draws on the same depths of stage creativity, but it uses everything else that theatre has become capable of since then. Full Review

The Stage (UK)

...dashes of Secret Cinema and theme-park ride thrown into the mix. If this spectacle is the future of West End shows, sign me up. There’s just the small problem of everything else. Full Review

The Stage (UK)

for a previous production Robins' ... strong form with spooky tales ... shines through in some of the meatier conversations ... but there’s a slightly forced nature to many of the exchanges. All the actors struggle to de-ossify a script that uses its characters as conduits. Full Review

Nine Lives
London Bridge
Time Out London

for a previous production It’s a stark, sparse piece that urges, above all, kindness.... Nyoni writes with a gentleness that doesn’t seem designed to provoke shock or outrage; instead it seeks to humanise Ishmael...' Full Review

The Stage (UK)

for a previous production But the show is too inconsistent in quality and vision to do itself justice. While it certainly fills the huge Dominion space, it does so through brute force rather than earning its grandeur. Full Review

Leopoldstadt
West End
The Stage (UK)

Leopoldstadt is not necessarily better than his previous work but it is different. It is the moment he stopped playing, looked us squarely in the face and said: “As a person, as a playwright, this is what I mean.” Full Review

The Stage (UK)

for a previous production Swift, slick, sexy, sounding better than ever and constantly spectacular, the posters that flood Shaftesbury Avenue are, to be fair, pretty much on the money: this is a Les Mis for the 21st century. Full Review

The Boy Friend
Southwark
The Stage (UK)

While White’s production has those occasional moments, its comedy isn’t always on the mark; too indulgent...But, mostly, for a couple of colourful hours of song and dance and silliness, being in Nice is nicer than not.' Full Review

The Stage (UK)

for a previous production [& Juliet] becomes something new. Nominally set in the past, with all kinds of shapes, sizes, colours and sexualities visible on stage, it feels more like a glorious vision of a Technicolor future. Full Review

The Stage (UK)

for a previous production But, even at almost three hours, the whole thing feels rushed. The songs are taken at a lick, and the production jolts from one set-piece to another without pause for breath...Watch the film, read the books. Save the magic. Full Review

High Fidelity
Battersea
The Stage (UK)

Music is what drives High Fidelity... The problem, though, is that while the resulting production makes constant reference to some of the best music ever created, it’s hampered by a bland pop score.' Full Review

Lungs
Southwark
The Stage (UK)

Even if Macmillan’s play gets a bit irritating in its iterations of liberal, middle-class hand-wringing, there are many, many killer lines and, in its entirety, Lungs is a thrilling meeting of head and heart.' Full Review

The Stage (UK)

And through all the stories of acting and activism, what emerges most poignantly is his deep devotion to theatre, whether it’s fun-loving amateurs, the long-dead days of weekly rep or the storied stages of the West End. Full Review

Blood Wedding
Southwark
The Stage (UK)

The marriage of Yaël Farber with Marina Carr should be a transcendent thing – and, mostly, it is. But, like the eponymous wedding in Federico García Lorca’s tragic play, it also falls apart towards the end.' Full Review

Preludes
Elephant and Castle
The Stage (UK)

A couple of false endings diminish the show’s potency, but otherwise the piece is a strange marvel. It’s less a musical and more a disruption – and thrillingly unlike anything else musical theatre has seen.' Full Review

The Stage (UK)

It isn’t dreadful, just assiduously dull. Its problems could have been solved with a staging that had some imagination, and direction that had some pace Full Review

On Your Feet!
West End
The Stage (UK)

Kinky Boots director Jerry Mitchell and book writer Alexander Dinelaris do a very decent job with this bio-musical, charting the Estefans’ lives...But there’s something a bit skewed about the pacing of Dinelaris’ book. Full Review

The Stage (UK)

It isn’t a perfect production, but they’ve put together a crack team...Everything in Daniel Evans’ production feeds into a picture of elegant, romantic Florence...' Full Review

Man of La Mancha
West End
The Stage (UK)

So, despite the starry casting of this really patchy production – it is odd watching Kelsey Grammer and Nicholas Lyndhurst side by side...what sustains most interest is simply the curiosity factor. Full Review

The Stage (UK)

It plays out as an unrelenting stream of obvious jokes and headline history. Tonally it doesn’t know whether to wink at us or whack us around the face, so it does both. The gulf between idea and execution is vast, and hardly worth the labour. Full Review

The Stage (UK)

Moss’ all-out approach to comedy comes at the expense of heart, but it mostly works. Mostly, the unrestrained approach adds to the show’s inherent silliness, but sometimes it makes things look a little sloppy. The set design featuring tassels of blonde hair hanging in fringes is an ugly backdrop. Full Review

The Stage (UK)

Jerusalem is the greatest play and Mark Rylance’s performance the greatest performance of the year. Of the decade. Of the 21st century. For all its interplay of past and present, reality and myth, it’s a phenomenal piece of theatre. Full Review

The Stage (UK)

Despite the sheer number of songs, few propel the plot or develop the characters. All we really learn about Clyde, for example, is that he likes cars – When I Drive is fantastically performed but has absolutely no substance – and guns...Luckily for the writers, the cast couldn’t mesmerise more. Full Review

The Stage (UK)

Always a risk in a play like this, Hare lets his extensive fact-finding slip into dialogue too baldly...It’s the cast, really, that sustains an interesting, flawed portrait of a man who built bridges as fast as he burned them. Full Review

The Stage (UK)

Every decision [Frecknall] makes here has clear, clever purpose. This Cabaret isn’t a radical reinterpretation, but its differences from previous productions plant themselves subtly at first, then ripple outward until they overwhelm. Full Review

The Stage (UK)

It’s the performances that jerk tears, conjure smiles, make hearts swoon or ache – not the story. As a musical it flails, but every time the quartet layers up those coil-tight harmonies, or Knight lets rip, it’s heaven. Full Review

The Stage (UK)

It’s the cast that carries the show: Carrie Hope Fletcher takes the lead and stomps around the stage in DMs with a brilliant ease. She catches the timing of Fennell’s comic lines, and her voice is ideal: strident, loud and occasionally fragile. Full Review

The Stage (UK)

Still, there’s no faulting the musical’s attempt to kindle a bit of happiness, a dollop of romance and a whole heap of joie de vivre. Full Review

The Stage (UK)

Jennifer Saunders delights as a dotty medium...Noel Coward’s deathless comedy hits the West End in a deft, but dragging production by Richard Eyre. Full Review

The Stage (UK)

While its length is a problem, its high points are riveting, Herrin’s production is cool and stylish, and it’s worth the surfeit to see Manville at her resplendent best.' Full Review

Endgame
Southwark
The Stage (UK)

Jones breathes new life into a play at risk of choking on its own aspic. By majoring on comedy, he shows how even at the bitter end, maybe especially then, life remains completely absurd.' Full Review

Fairview
Southwark
The Stage (UK)

Fairview is a play of shattering ingenuity and ambition, served by a stunning production that doesn’t flinch for a second...The dialogue is dizzyingly good...' Full Review

The Stage (UK)

Whatever you’ve been dreaming of, this isn’t quite it...But David Ives and Paul Blake’s adaptation, which premiered in the US in 2000, thins out the plot, weakens the characters, and removes most of the drama. Full Review

The Stage (UK)

for a previous production As shown in The Greatest Showman, Pasek and Paul have cracked the formula for four-chord pop songs; songs with a golden touch...Yes, a couple of those in second act are mawkish, but the rest are superb. Full Review

The Stage (UK)

Marianne Elliott and Miranda Cromwell’s take on Death of a Salesman captures the greatness of Arthur Miller’s play, and at the same time turns it into something that feels astonishingly new. Full Review

Vassa
Camden Town
The Stage (UK)

It feels like this is a production at odds with its text...There’s a palpable imbalance to things. Sometimes the actors deadpan and sometimes they ramp up their grotesquery, but there’s never a clear reason why they’re doing either. Full Review

Groan Ups
West End
The Stage (UK)

There are big laughs and plenty of them, but they sit uneasily with the straighter strain of the story. It’s not quite a case of Mischief Theatre Goes Wrong, but it’s not one of the company’s best either. Full Review

The Stage (UK)

A star turn from Lucian Msamati...Fugard’s mastery of structure becomes very clear, as does the reason behind Weise’s decision to sit back and let the words do the work.' Full Review

Big The Musical
West End
The Stage (UK)

Why does it feel like we’ve been here before? Let me count the ways: the zillionth beloved-film-to-banal-musical adaptation the West End has seen, Big belittles its source material and turns endearing quirk into generic mush. Full Review

The Stage (UK)

The play touches genre after genre, constantly twisting itself, always entertaining, and finally becoming its own weird and extraordinary thing: stunningly political and superbly theatrical.' Full Review

The Stage (UK)

for a previous production For its 50th anniversary, producer Michael Harrison has brought Joseph – and Jason Donovan – back to the Palladium for this joyful, colour-saturated production by Laurence Connor. The changes aren’t colossal, but the scale is. Full Review

Bitter Wheat
West End
The Stage (UK)

Flabby, cynical and pointless...Malkovich, a brilliant actor, isn’t brilliant here. He delivers everything in an unceasing monotone, like someone doing some drilling next door. Full Review

The Stage (UK)

It’s full of calm and gentle wisdom about existence. We may have seen many more plays about sad, middle-aged white men in the 10 years since its Broadway premiere, but few have been as sensitive or, perhaps even, profound. Full Review

All My Sons
Hornchurch
The Stage (UK)

for a previous production Stunning performances from Sally Field and Bill Pullman...its power lies in the way it makes a great play as great as it can be: in the finesse and in the details...' Full Review