Tim Teeman

Tim Teeman is a critic with Daily Beast. This account has been auto-generated, and does not indicate that this person is an active member of Show-Score.com. That said, if you "follow" this member, you will automatically be updated whenever s/he writes a new review.

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Reviews (170)
Toni Stone
Midtown W
Tim Teeman

"The beguiling magic of 'Toni Stone' the play, directed by MacKinnon (and based on Ackmann’s 2010 biography), is many-fold, but it is heralded by a charming and emphatic performance by April Matthis in the title role of Stone herself, and Diamond’s script, which has both a lightness of touch and resonant depth...Stone emerges as such a fascinating figure, thanks to Diamond’s words and Matthis’ gold-star performance, that you only want to know more about her after the play ends." Full Review

Daily Beast

"'Beetlejuice,' as it now presents itself, is a loopy, nutty, loud, winning hoot. It’s still pretty tasteless, lewd and inappropriate too—just acceptably so...Kritzer’s performance is one of the comic cherries-on-top of the Broadway season...Yes, the show is an extremely long two and a half plus hours, yes it feels off-balance in places, but it is also shameless, big, bold, fun and brassy. This is the miss that may well become a hit." Full Review

Tootsie (NYC)
Midtown W
Daily Beast

“The Broadway version of the 1982 movie is both chaotic and apologetic, with a sharper and better book than it has music. The show has speeches grafted into it about gender inequality and feminist respect that stand out like absurd sore thumbs.. The book...is witty and sharp...If the words are mostly on point, the music, design, and choreography of ‘Tootsie’ rarely rise above meh...This ‘Tootsie’ is slightly lost in its own cloud of sequins and cultural intent.” Full Review

Daily Beast

"As zippy as 'A Doll’s House, Part 2,' but whereas that felt new, fresh, and subversive, 'Hillary and Clinton' feels like very old and well-trodden ground, a mash-up of every single argument you’ve ever heard (with very little new insight) in favor and against Hillary...Metcalf’s Hillary is a candidate of many weathers, which Metcalf skillfully commandeers: variously intelligent, morose, angry, despairing, determined...But the play also feels as airless as the hotel room we are in." Full Review

Burn This
Midtown W
Daily Beast

“Sure, the relationship of Pale and Anna is the focus, and we are supposed to think that opposites will attract. But he is such a nightmare and so unhinged, you would want him out of your apartment and bed, not in them...Even if one were not watching 'Burn This' with a 2019 cultural filter, the relationship between Anna and Pale feels unconvincing to the point of preposterous...The actors here make as best sense out of it as they can." Full Review

Daily Beast

“This Mad Ones' production is just as subtle and direct in its wonderful writing and characterization...There are no big emotional speeches by any members of this group, but instead we watch a steady accumulation of life detail and tensions around sexism and racism that simmer while questions about the show are asked and answered. It's both very funny and extremely excruciating...’Mrs. Murray's Menagerie’ is both plain and intriguing.” Full Review

Daily Beast

"The joy of watching Glenda Jackson as Lear in Sam Gold’s lean and clear production is that she doesn’t approach every well-known speech or phrasing at a grandiloquent gallop...This is a cast that honors, has thought about, then handsomely delivers Shakespeare’s greatest words, and—mission accomplished—the audience this critic sat within was rapt for three-plus hours...Its only fault, and it was a significantly intrusive one for this critic, is a group of musicians," Full Review

Daily Beast

"The story is grand, and yet also very self-contained, timid, and safe; this is more allegory than history and more factsheet than drama...The three actors and their director treat the Lehman story as a precise, clean ballet. Stefano Massini’s script, adapted by Ben Power, is one of wit, debate, poetry and soliloquy; not mess, complication, and moral ambiguity...The story is dense with detail, too much; it's like a clever child in class with its hand up all the time." Full Review

White Noise
East Village
Daily Beast

"The mechanics of this slavery produced gasps in our audience. Inevitably, the friendship between the two men is supplanted by the ugly dynamics of master and slave...Parks' ideas and arguments are so alive one can look past the play's plausibility-stretching plot points; indeed, the slavery dynamic is so convincingly acted, frighteningly so, that its plausibility becomes sharpened...A thought-provoking and thoughtful examination of racism." Full Review

Daily Beast

"Glorious to watch, a sumptuous treat. But whatever gender controversies the musical, originally mounted in 1948, once provoked, whatever issues it raised about male control and female compliance, have been cheerfully erased...This is a conservative, conventional tweaking rather than audacious re-scaffolding of a classic...O’Hara has the kind of shimmering, operatic voice that feels too big, too good, too luminous, for Broadway." Full Review

Fleabag
Soho/Tribeca
Tim Teeman

"Waller-Bridge’s chameleon-like delivery, mannerisms, and facial expression changes make it feel like a much more populated production...This monologue contains multitudes...A beautifully written and performed clash of the real and surreal; the profane and very serious...Waller-Bridge doesn’t set out to shock as much as to make what we perceive as shocking everyday...The writing is deliciously without limits, with taboos more vaporized than trampled." Full Review

Sea Wall/A Life
East Village
Daily Beast

"These are more radio short stories, standing monologues, than anything more or bigger. And so they suffer slightly, because here we are in a theater watching the brilliant Gyllenhaal and Sturridge delivering respectable but somehow too-restrained one-man shows...There are no twists. The characters do not surprise us. To reference another duality, it’s odd that two short plays about such big themes should end up feeling small." Full Review

Daily Beast

"Mimi Lien’s precisely evocative set for this Roundabout Theatre Company production is as impressive as the acting...Austin is the biggest, most watchable surprise; Dano's paralytic letting-go is wonderful—a cavalcade of clowning, pratfalls, and jerky limbs—because what’s more funny than a fuddy-duddy going loco...The tragic love story in 'True West' is between brothers, but Shepard and his actors gruffly disavow what that might mean, and the play is all the more puzzling because of it." Full Review

Daily Beast

“Sorkin’s Maycomb looks the same, and stretches of his script sound the same as the novel and movie...This Atticus, these black characters, remain in 1933, but have been imagined for us in an era of Ferguson...Sher’s direction is too languid: the tension of the book and film is missing...Sorkin is speaking for and to us, a modern audience...But he is also lessening...off-setting, the injustices of a specific historical period, as viewed by a white writer of that time.” Full Review

Daily Beast

"If you want side-eye and bravura camp, Block supplies it. If you want a full tribute to Bob Mackie’s gloriously outlandish and memorable Cher costumes they are here in the most delirious fashion show New York Fashion Week has never seen staged...It’s an enjoyable circus of spectacle and music and familiarity; and it’s also not the same as having the star itself in a big room entertaining everyone." Full Review

Downstairs
West Village
Tim Teeman

"Rebeck’s lean, tense thriller and psychological drama...Rebeck increases the tension because we can see both brother and sister are so complexly intertwined...A thriller and convincing marital and family drama that says a lot in its silences, and with excellent performances from its three actors that make this particular basement somewhere you never want to be again." Full Review

Daily Beast

"'The Prom' is encumbered with hackneyed familiarity when it comes to characters and plot, and a broad comedy and forced brightness and lightness where at least a tinge of darkness or reality would have been more welcome...The musical seeks to tell a simpler tale, yet it also aims to be both satire and cultural lesson...The message, ultimately, is positive...It’s just sad and depressing that the story and characters have to be so simple and unchallenging to get there." Full Review

King Kong (NYC)
Midtown W
Daily Beast

"The problem with 'King Kong' is that the humans on stage do not know what to do when King Kong is elsewhere, and the production doesn’t know what to do with them either...As pure spectacle, 'King Kong' thrillingly delivers. The songs are fine rather than memorable and the story simple and fluent rather than dense and chewy. But really, neither has to do much more. This is all about the hulking, crouching, flying, not-very-hidden King Kong­—and the ape has totally got this." Full Review

Daily Beast

"This play, directed with a stilted nerviness by Kenny Leon, is strangely locked in on itself. It is 90 minutes long, and rigidly stuck in the grooves it sets up right at the beginning. These grooves are vital and timely themes, but 'American Son' nullifies their impact through clunky storytelling and flat characterization...Manipulative and crass...The way the ending is phrased and treated...feels rushed and horribly exploitative...Both a waste of important material and its talented cast." Full Review

India Pale Ale
Midtown W
Daily Beast

“This...production comes to us less in anger than understanding; this uneven and unfocused play wants to reach out...The play moves in odd currents...The act of violence...feels imposed...Tonally, there is no lead-up...It feels inserted for incident, and the portraits of grief and reconstruction afterwards feel bitty and incomplete...A similar lack of coherence haunts the direction...A tangle of good intentions and cultural politics do not always a good play make.” Full Review

The Ferryman (NYC)
Midtown W
Daily Beast

"A rollicking, moving, enveloping masterpiece, an emphatic herald of the strength and power of original playwriting...Do whatever you can to see it; much-loved relations, prepare to be sold. Rarely is theater so beautifully written, brilliantly acted and directed, and impressively mounted...A feast of dramatic forms and shapes...So full of textured, watchable characters telling stories of modern times and times of yore, that one leaves the play wishing to watch hours more of it." Full Review

Gloria: A Life
Gramercy
Tim Teeman

"An uncritical but still inspiring survey of the feminist icon’s life...Less a piece of theatre and more an act of communion and consciousness-raising...Yes, the excellent, charismatic Christine Lahti skillfully embodies Steinem in the play’s first act...But the play comes to an even more emotional and forceful life in its second half...The first half is rousing to watch, but rarely willing to burrow deeper and more critically into its subject...A highly curated and selective positive biograp... Full Review

Travisville
Midtown W
Daily Beast

“Such a good, tight play...Barring a strange deflation of storytelling towards the end (it feels like the play doesn't know when or how to end right), it is a polished jewel of writing and acting, and carried by some sharp and distinctive performances from its cast of nine...Stylistically, scenes run into one another; the words of one character blanketed by the next. It's an effective technique sometimes, and a little irritating at others.” Full Review

Tim Teeman

"That darkness is not just confined to one scene, but is spiritually draped over Daniel Fish’s daring, brilliant, utterly absorbing re-interpretation...This version of 'Oklahoma!' interrogates themes of gender, class, desire, crime, and punishment. It does this seriously and with fun, and with an overall smart snappiness in its tone and characters...The production is played, extremely skillfully, for laughs and the very opposite of laughs." Full Review

Tim Teeman

"Tonally, the story bounces between the biblical, metaphorical, and everyday. Lucas’ writing is gilded in the language of therapy and recovery, which can sound didactic and overwrought, especially when added to the trickiness of the play’s construction. But it is also welcomingly waspish...The play, for all its meta-parlor games, feels sharpest and most humane when its characters directly connect." Full Review

Daily Beast

“This is one delicious piece of theater...This beautifully written play has an odd set of concordances with ‘Burn This’...The production is anchored in two of the best performances currently on Broadway. McDonald and Shannon are a chemistry experiment made explosive, and made right. They are a delight to watch, to cringe for, and to respond to...These are two exceptional performances in total concert.” Full Review

Ink
Midtown W
Daily Beast

“Graham’s uneven, intriguing play—with two excellent performances by Miller and Carvel...This play is more celebration than moral inquisition. It doesn’t put Murdoch on trial for the things he is most condemned for now, it is a mainly sympathetic origin story...Miller is excellent as Lamb...’Ink’ is squarely a play of the past, and it is at its best celebrating the giddiness of The Sun’s birth...’Ink’s’ most stunning scene is a sudden segue to ballet.” Full Review

All My Sons
Midtown W
Daily Beast

"There is the pleasure, for the first half anyway, of Miller’s 'All My Sons' of well-executed theatrical convention; the reassurance of a revival done traditionally and done right...There is nothing off-the-wall, no pushing of envelopes, or headline-making outrages. Directed by O’Brien, this is a steady ship, entirely respectful of its source...In this second half that the play starts to creak, and all that seemed grand and luxuriant in the first part begins to feel heavy-handed and rushed." Full Review

Daily Beast

"Even though this retelling of a well-trodden Greek myth feels slight, it also makes for a joyful performance. Mitchell’s musical is delicious to look at and listen to even if its story is as wan as its central couple...As repetitive as the musical becomes, Chavkin’s busy, warm staging and its wonderful music and energy means ‘Hadestown’ is like listening to an epic song around a roaring fire...Less a tragic love story than a rousing celebration and affirmation of a craft.” Full Review

Daily Beast

“That this ‘spoken and sung performance piece’ isn’t so much better is surprising as it features big stars...Yet despite all this blue-chipness, ‘Norma Jeane Baker of Troy’ is a strange, lifeless, opaque mess, possessing a kind of theatrical pretension that gets ridiculed in plays or films about theatrical pretension...The script drifts...Whishaw and Fleming do not perform badly; what on earth they are performing is the issue.” Full Review

Daily Beast

"Fish’s daring, brilliant, utterly absorbing re-interpretation...It does this seriously and with fun, and with an overall smart snappiness in its tone and characters...They look inquiring, pained, split about what and who they want in their futures. The production is played, extremely skillfully, for laughs and the very opposite of laughs...Fish and his cast ask reasoned questions...those questions are answered with vivid, pugnacious confidence." Full Review

Tim Teeman

"This is still a sharply timely play, and it is both hopeful and painful, but mostly, hopeful—and a hearteningly diverse Broadway audience responds volubly in kind...The sharpest parts of the production are Schreck talking about her personal experiences around abortion and male violence against women...Shreck is such an engaging performer, she still somehow cleverly studs wit into this confessional, noting that she got pregnant while playing Miss Julie." Full Review

Daily Beast

"This jukebox musical not only has life, it also has wit, intelligence, while also looking stunning and full of energy...It’s as funny, revealing and moving as it is hummable and toe-tapping...Music is the route to personal salvation as well as fame and success, with Morisseau excellent at elevating detail amid the grand sweep...Instead of telling these storylines in an overwrought style, or even telling them at length, Morisseau and McAnuff figure out a lean, clever middle way." Full Review

Nantucket Sleigh Ride
Upper W Side
Daily Beast

"There is no need to outline the maze-like series of absurdities and twists the play takes, but you may wonder—like my seat neighbor—what the point of all it was (even when a lobster is electrocuted in one standout scene). The clash of real and surreal makes investing in the characters that much more tricky; the children just seem fantastically odd." Full Review

Daily Beast

"It left me puzzled, cold, and (at moments) plain furious...The cartoonish acting, the ‘crazeee’ expressions and heightened everything means that every moment comes at you like an ‘OMG!!!’ sledgehammer...You can pick whatever message path you want through this brightly lit madness...The worst feeling during ‘Be More Chill’ is that you’ve seen all these characters before…‘Be More Chill’ feels squawkily split between camp sci fi romp and searing teenage-life-today commentary." Full Review

Hurricane Diane
East Village
Tim Teeman

"The witty and intelligent play ‘Hurricane Diane’ finds Dionysus transformed into a modern-day sexed-up gardener, laser-focused on seducing a group of New Jersey housewives...Blackwell plays the gardener brilliantly, with a suggestive leer, lusty smile, and deeply felt serious purpose...There is a lovely humor to George’s play, directed with an anarchic brio by Leigh Silverman...All four of the women are carefully and wittily drawn, and brought to stage life just as sharply." Full Review

Freestyle Love Supreme
West Village
Daily Beast

“An excellent production...Improvised hip-hop, song, and movement are made thrillingly universal through audience participation...A brisk, extremely funny 75 minutes...The charming thing about the group is they are not absolutely, smoothly right on target all the time. They’re not a precise quartet. It’s a pleasure to watch them wrestle with the artistic process...and make something so good up on the spot, but with all the roughened edges." Full Review

Daily Beast

“A stirringly acted drama about desire, masculinity, and identity...The songs are beautiful, and beautifully sung, if sometimes puzzlingly placed...Pharus' refusal to obviously define himself, or for the play to define him, is key to the play and yet dramatically it is also a flaw...The play unloads key pieces of information and lets them sit unelaborated upon. These oddities do not undermine Pope and Clay's excellent performances, or the power of a story about the cost of coming out." Full Review

Network (NYC)
Midtown W
Tim Teeman

"When do you really feel you are feasting on the meat and bones of the play?...Mostly when Bryan Cranston’s beautifully, near-perfectly-performed newscaster-turned-furious-prophet Howard Beale is speaking...Cranston’s performance is a wonder...There is one final glorious visual trick that confirms van Hove and Versweyveld as superior stage magicians—even if, with 'Network,' their box of tricks feels a little overstuffed. Bryan Cranston provides all the magic this production needs." Full Review

The Hard Problem
Upper W Side
Daily Beast

"The characters feel like conveniently placed echo-chambers and spokespeople, rather than people believably living within these big ideas and their effects. The play more plausibly illustrates the corporatization of neuroscience, and where that is leading us...Still, Stoppard studs the play’s odd dramatic cul-de-sacs and theoretical density with jokes and zinging put-downs—and at the end supplies a genuine emotional punch." Full Review

Tim Teeman

"On a simple and stark black stage, with occasional jets of theatrical smoke to evoke the battlefield, the play intersperses popular songs sung by soldiers of the time with actors reading the memories and letters home of real soldiers and famous poets of the era...This fantastic company of actors sing beautifully in harmony and a capella...The superb 'All Is Calm' leaves us mulling the terrible futility and cost of war, while crystallizing a moment of beautiful humanity." Full Review

Daily Beast

"The potential for irritation is high, but in keeping the musical’s complaining, mulling, and resolving to a brisk 90 minutes and by keeping its charm and 11 songs witty and sunny, 'The Other Josh Cohen' succeeds with a humble and open-hearted modesty. The musical, directed with a ditzy energy by Hunter Foster, won’t shake up your world. It doesn’t reinvent musical theatre either. But it’s a lark and a polished lark at that." Full Review

Usual Girls
Midtown W
Daily Beast

“Vibrantly colorful and raw exploration of female identity, friendship, and isolation—performed by an excellent, almost all-female company...A very personal history of #MeToo. It isn't a smooth play, it is proudly scuffed at its edges. It feels workshop-py, rather than neat and sleek. Director Tyne Rafaeli summons up bitty expositions of elementary school, middle school, high school, college, and the present day in a production full of scattered energy and inquiry.” Full Review

Daily Beast

“This uneven drama wants you to laugh and cry...May is being required to play her age at its most challenging and diminishing, and she does it so well. It is painful to watch. That’s how good she is...The play, which is very static and repetitive, moves...at Gladys’ pace, and so we see the effects of Alzheimer’s on those around her keenly...The laughter around me was nervous, and the direction that encourages that laughter feels just as nervous. Just what does this play want us to do?" Full Review

Tim Teeman

"Punchy, crisp, and sly...The laughs are combined with some tougher drama...Race, ideals of beauty, and personal identity are at the heart of 'School Girls'—and they are uncompromisingly addressed by Bioh and the cast. The play is only 75 minutes long, and perhaps on the Lortel stage that makes sense. But it is so smart, quick, and intelligent this critic kept wishing it was longer. Maybe if it grows to a bigger stage, it just might." Full Review

Tim Teeman

“Zinging, excellent journalism-based play...It is intelligent, thought-provoking, and challenging to the audience...Every contradiction cloaked in the term ‘literary non-fiction’ is thoroughly, beautifully deconstructed by the all-excellent Radcliffe, Jones, and Cannavale...This clever and nuanced play is less in thrall to the romance of long form narrative as it is in the business of getting things right, in telling as close to the truth as one can." Full Review

Mother of the Maid
East Village
Tim Teeman

"Close powerfully plays the devoted mother of Joan of Arc...A witty and piercing play...This production is the most impressive and perceptive of the brace of underpar Joan of Arc-themed theatre pieces...Anderson perfectly melds the comedy and drama of making the historical and mythic domestic and earthy...’Mother of the Maid’ asks what it must have been like to have been related to Joan...Close plays Isabelle with a focused fierceness." Full Review

Tim Teeman

"A snapshot of times past featuring a collection of songs in the spirit of the waspish, linguistically playful constructions of Coward, Porter, and Sondheim. The music is punctuated by frustratingly abbreviated dramatic scenes...The most interesting stories at the heart of this play­­­­­­ go completely unexplored, as do a flurry of plot and psychological developments...There are a lot of ghosts...but they need more life and dramatic room to breathe to make us care about them." Full Review

Daily Beast

"As beautifully sung, staged, and played as his music is, Bob Dylan can feel a little in the way in 'Girl From the North Country.' The songs don’t add to what we see in front of us; they luxuriantly, resonantly echo what we know rather than deepen McPherson’s troubled characters. This production is beautiful in so many ways, but this critic ultimately wanted less of a musical master and more of the playwright’s vision." Full Review

Private Peaceful
Midtown W
Daily Beast

"An intense tour de force...A stunning performance...This powerful play has been cleverly and movingly adapted and directed...O’Regan, Reader, and Bhatia make us graphically feel the terror of being cannon fodder, fighting for one’s country amid the mud, rats, and rain...In playing so many characters so brilliantly, O’Regan also paints, better than multiple actors could, all the influences, good and bad, that contribute to the psychological canvas of the sweet-but-scarred Tommo himself." Full Review