Tom Wicker

Tom Wicker is a critic with Exeunt Magazine. This account has been auto-generated, and does not indicate that this person is an active member of Show-Score.com. That said, if you "follow" this member, you will automatically be updated whenever s/he writes a new review.

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Reviews (34)
Only Fools and Horses
Westminster
Time Out London

It’s affectionate fun. There are some good gags – including an early tease of Del’s bar fall – and the sitcom's iconic theme tune works well as a refrain (sung by the cast) for the twinkly cheekiness of this show’s tone. Full Review

Time Out London

[Everybody’s Talking About Jamie] is a joyous punch in the air about following your dreams and being yourself. ‘Life-affirming’ is generally an over-used term, but not here. This production owns the stage. Full Review

#WeAreArrested
Dalston
Time Out London

Gripping but weirdly anonymised adaptation of editor Can Dündar’s memoir about his arrest by the Turkish state...The show’s almost procedural flow of detail exerts its own pull...' Full Review

Blood Wedding
Lambeth
Time Out London

There are electric moments, particularly whenever Thalissa Teixeria’s white-suited Moon takes to the stage...But ‘Blood Wedding’ is often so bluntly miserable as to become numbing: an oppressive pile-up of tragedy.' Full Review

Afterglow
Southwark
Time Out London

This saucy gay comedy-drama has been a cult hit in New York, but its UK premiere is wearying and cliched...feels like a straight play in gay drag – a wasted opportunity to portray real lives in real ways.' Full Review

Time Out London

Tyrone Huntley lights up this moving musical...The View UpStairs’ is sometimes too on the nose. But it’s also funny, moving and, crucially, angry with a ferocity that slams together ‘then’ with a Trump-divided ‘now’...' Full Review

And The Rest of Me Floats
Shepherds Bush
Time Out London

A whole history of community surges electrically through the production’s 75 minutes as it never pauses in one mood for long. ‘And the Rest of Me Floats’ sticks up two fingers at the bigots while blowing a kiss.' Full Review

Uncle Vanya
Westminster
Time Out London

Bits of Johnson’s modernised language sometime jar, but – cribbing from one of Uncle Vanya’s key lines – this nicely judged production manages to be painful as well as funny. Full Review

The Woman In White
Charing Cross
Time Out London

It’s good to see a musical where the female characters drive the story. Marian and Laura do (and risk) far more than the self-pitying Walter to expose Sir Percival, in a situation where the men have all the power. Full Review

Animal
Chelsea
Exeunt Magazine

"The cast do well at coloring in the various shades of the play’s imaginatively inside-out progress through a stricken mind. However, 'Animal' ultimately struggles to ground its swirl of ideas in a specific person with a particular story, as Rachel suffers from double duty as both focal point and a mystery...For most of the play, she is an effective mouthpiece for a potent social critique, but strangely nebulous as a character...Watching it is ultimately a detached experience." Full Review

Love, Love, Love
Midtown W
The Telegraph (UK)

"'Love, Love, Love' lacks the finesse of Bartlett’s recent work...Here, things shift awkwardly into serious gear in the final act. Also, while Ryan is bitterly hilarious as Sandra, delivering crushing put-downs in a sing-song voice, her character gets few of the glimpses of humanity granted to Kenneth...Nevertheless, Bartlett’s writing–driven by the breathlessly hysterical tone of director Michael Mayer’s production–is savagely and relentlessly funny in Kenneth and Sandra’s scenes with their ... Full Review

Heisenberg
Midtown W
The Stage (UK)

"The play initially feels like a kooky rom-com. But as Georgie’s torrent of quirky chatter shades into something sharper and more ambiguous, so, too, does the production...There’s something generously honest in 'Heisenberg' about ordinariness. With humour and a low-level ache of sadness, it tunes into those small, often overlooked encounters that can spin people’s lives off in new directions." Full Review

Pss Pss
Midtown W
Fest (UK)

for a previous production "Fassari and Pessi are a double-act in the mold of Chaplin – and are simply the best mime artists...A show of comedy-driven feats that beguile rather than strut...The show’s success lies in Fassari and Pessi’s onstage rapport and fluid expressivity...Sometimes 'Pss Pss’s' general air of whimsy becomes a little too much, tipping over into being cloying. And the low-key pace won’t be for those seeking flashiness. But this is a gem of a show, abundant with gentle wit and buckets of charm." Full Review

The Humans
Midtown W
Exeunt Magazine

for a previous production "Karam effortlessly nails the brittle prickle of well-meant family reunions…Everyone on stage has their demons and their secrets, many of which – if distilled – would sound formulaic…But these roll out so organically, and are given life by the brilliantly natural cast, that they tumble rather than thud…Mantello finds the silences surrounding the script’s humour, broadening what is a sharply funny portrait of New York City’s housing market into something bigger." Full Review

Old Times
Midtown W
The Telegraph (UK)

"If this production stumbles at times, it’s in the stylised poise of Reilly’s performance. She’s a fantasy figure, rather than the fearfully blank space where a person used to be...This twisting, elusive play becomes a tale of a haunting. But here, the chill comes not from the supernatural but the past. The play prickles with unspoken trauma and Hodge succeeds in turning the temperature to sub-zero." Full Review

Ross & Rachel
Midtown E
Exeunt Magazine

for a previous production "The beauty of James Fritz’s new play is the way he sticks a knife into a sitcom-styled happy-ever-after to tear a bleeding hole in all of the stories we tell ourselves to make our relationships work in spite of our doubts. It’s a fiercely sharp yet tender anatomy of the lie of love…Martin keeps a tight leash on his production’s tone, pulling back on sentimentality to emphasize the bruised, dull pain…Vevers is superb...Her skill is in always keeping the characters distinct." Full Review

Exeunt Magazine

for a previous production "What’s refreshing here is just how formidable Anderson’s Blanche is...While Anderson might be the star attraction, the most compellingly original performance is Ben Foster’s...It’s a shame, then, that the production flounders at the same time Blanche begins to come apart at the seams...The tone shifts to heavily applied surrealism, lacking the freshness of what has gone before...This otherwise powerfully visceral production feels disappointingly laboured as it draws to a close." Full Review

Blithe Spirit
Charing Cross
Time Out London

[Jennifer Saunders] is a robust bustle of beige knitwear, physical comedy and conspicuous quirks. It’s an off-the-peg ‘Ab Fab’ sketch: funny but a little too familiar. Full Review

Time Out London

McPherson’s book is a haunting slice of Depression-era Americana that draws not only on Dylan’s songbook but finds inspiration in the sad, vivid pages of authors like John Steinbeck. Full Review

Translations
Lambeth
Time Out London

The play’s nuanced, elegiac and often wrenching exploration of the power and violence of language in 1830s Donegal is as potent as ever. Full Review

Preludes
Southwark
Time Out London

...it’s a strange, beautiful, sprawling piece about creativity, writer’s block and legacy. It’s unlike any biographical drama you’ll have seen.' Full Review

Torch Song
Battersea
Time Out London

Like Arnold, the gay, Jewish drag queen at its centre, Harvey Fierstein’s LGBTQ+ classic ‘Torch Song’ is anxious and wistful. The writing spills over with rapid-fire patter. It’s also full of heart and hope.' Full Review

Time Out London

But where ‘Toast’ succeeds is in capturing the same intoxicating, engrossing pleasure of food that the real-life Slater turns into mouth-watering poetry in his cookbooks. Full Review

Time Out London

“It’s affectionate fun. There are some good gags and the sitcom's iconic theme tune works well as a refrain for the twinkly cheekiness of this show’s tone...But the show’s storyline is stretched thinly here...The resulting experience is like a low-stakes drift through a Madame Tussauds exhibition and a greatest hits compilation. Ranger’s slightly stiff staging doesn’t help.” Full Review

Time Out London

for a previous production ★★★★ "Jonathan Pryce and Eileen Atkins shine in this elliptical drama from Florian Zeller." Full Review

Time Out London

for a previous production "This is an energising show, performed by its seven actors in song to a foot-stomping rhythm, capturing the heady rush of finding a cause to fight for...There’s real power here, as each performer takes their turn in the spotlight to give their own perspective...What adrenalizes this show are the differences it splits open between the students depending on their background. It’s not a tidy portrait of people unified by a common cause...It’s also a funny, humane piece of work." Full Review

Duat
East Village
Exeunt Magazine

"There’s something beautifully unapologetic about where 'Duat' goes, conceptually and staging-wise. Its horizons keep broadening, into the cosmic, the metaphysical, and you go with it...This is a show that sprawls all over the place, but does so in a way that embraces the poetry and possibility of failure...'Duat' is fierce, funny and mournful; a sung, sometimes whispered, ode to race, queerness and difference. It profoundly touched me." Full Review

The Stage (UK)

"Karam’s adaptation of 'The Cherry Orchard' is one of wit and freshness...Director Simon Godwin fumbles things, staging the first act as farce, the characters mugging as if they know they’re in a Chekhov play. It muffles Karam’s writing. When the production slows down, breathes, and lets the performances speak for themselves, it’s powerful. Diverse casting brings a present-day sharpness to the play’s critique of a ruling class reaping the benefits of slavery and inequality." Full Review

Burning Doors
East Village
Time Out London

for a previous production "The harsh, sometimes absurdist theatricality of the staging becomes a discomforting analogue for the ritualized humiliation and control employed by the Russian authorities...‘Burning Doors’ is too long and baggily structured; clumsy in places. But two Russian officials trying to understand artistic dissent while taking a shit...is a sharp splash of pitch-black humor. And ‘Burning Doors’ moves effectively from this provocation to the agony and defiance of its final, almost wordless scenes." Full Review

The Stage (UK)

for a previous production "Gary Owen’s blisteringly good play...The writing is stingingly funny and sharp as jagged glass...Owen picks deftly through the wreckage of Effie’s world, like a compassionate, clear-sighted preserver. Sherman Cymru’s artistic director Rachel O’Riordan captures the play’s many tonal changes in her production, which is fluid and textured. It’s a masterclass on how to keep an audience focused in the right way...It’s a breathtaking, bruisingly good performance." Full Review

Fool For Love
Midtown W
Exeunt Magazine

"There’s a heavy-handed expediency to these scenes, of narrative positioning. The speeches flesh out the characters but weigh down the production, dissipating the angry energy...But it all snaps back into focus with a kiss...It’s a powerful moment in a production that successfully frames the scorching embrace of passion and hate that underpins the play like a distorted family photo." Full Review

Exeunt Magazine

"Where this show falls apart isn’t in the details, it’s in the bagginess with which they’re all strung together...Basically, this is a case of the Emperor’s new clothes, if the Emperor’s new clothes were a theatrical conceit. By the end, the amplified, mechanistic cranking sound effect that accompanies every set change might as well be the insular echo of self-applause. For, as bright as its occasional flashes of brilliance are, 'Fondly, Collette Richland' is too dazzled by itself to draw you... Full Review

Operation Crucible
Midtown W
The Stage (UK)

for a previous production "Knowles’s mosaic-like approach assuredly builds to some gut-wrenching final moments. These later scenes are the best...In contrast, the play’s early moments, while inventive and energetic, feel breathless and rushed. But when the production slows down and has the confidence to allow quiet, stillness and its atmospheric lighting and sound to draw the audience in – it’s electrifying, personal and raw." Full Review

Daddy Long Legs
Midtown W
Exeunt Magazine

for a previous production "There’s a lot to like about this show. But if this production’s source material is good value, its strict adherence to it is one of its main drawbacks. An epistolary novel is not the easiest fit for a theatrical piece, and there’s a lack of imagination on display here." Full Review