Tony Adler

Tony Adler is a critic with Chicago Reader. This account has been auto-generated, and does not indicate that this person is an active member of Show-Score.com. That said, if you "follow" this member, you will automatically be updated whenever s/he writes a new review.

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Reviews (10)
Chicago Reader

for a previous production “There's a stick-figure quality to the show in Robert Falls's staging, like a picture book drawn by a child. Despite the presence of a sophisticated six-piece band, Cale's songs stay simple; in fact they come across as the same song given a dozen iterations. Cale himself projects an artless physicality, at once goofy and solemn, especially when he sticks out his hands to approximate flying. Maybe 'We're Only Alive' is better understood as a reliving than a memoir. " Full Review

Chicago Reader

for a previous production "Watching the marvelous production...you might find yourself thinking how cluttered and limited most conventional plays can seem by comparison...For me, this time, the centerpiece of the play was the one we usually forget about: the pair of Pozzo interludes...Rory Nolan's Pozzo and Garrett Lombard's Lucky are indispensable to the success of these passages...Similarly, the physicality Marty Rea and Aaron Monaghan bring to Didi and Gogo might make a silent 'Godot' possible." Full Review

Ride the Cyclone
West Village
Chicago Reader

for a previous production "'Ride the Cyclone' starts as eerie fun...We get to know the dead through a series of truly marvelous musical numbers directed and choreographed by Rachel Rockwell...But the authors are too intent on quirky amusement. They don't push hard enough, and the show is finally an exceedingly cool but empty thrill." Full Review

Churchill
Midtown W
Chicago Reader

for a previous production "Winston Churchill was a statesman and a total badass. Ronald Keaton never shows us the formidable temperament behind them. Genial, sly, occasionally poignant, the performance is engaging but lacks bite. It's as if Keaton were playing a nostalgic old pal of Churchill's rather than Churchill himself." Full Review

Ada|Ava
Financial
Chicago Reader

for a previous production "Every once in a while you see something that makes you go, 'Hunh. That's new.' It'll have lots of elements you recognize, but also some that seem entirely strange, and the whole thing will unwind in a way that catches not only your attention but your breath. That's how I felt on seeing 'Ada/Ava' last summer." Full Review

Chicago Reader

“’The Cher Show’ makes a sly subtext of the diva's triumph over talent...Elice devotes a whole production number to...Mackie gowns that were the real stars of her weekly TV shows and...source of her popularity...There aren't enough decent Cher hits to fill out the jukebox score...The cast is strong - especially Berresse as Mackie and Diamond as the youngest of the multiple Chers. But when this thing goes to Broadway, the Carole King show, ‘Beautiful’, will be playing nearby. See that.” Full Review

Chicago Reader

“There are no big surprises in Jessica Sherr's 60-minute solo, no novel insights...Yes, Bette Davis faced sexism in the movie industry. Yes, it was lonely at the top...The main appeal of ‘Sissie’...Is Sherr herself, whose Davis isn't quite like any you've seen, adding a bright comic energy to the usual semaphore gestures and wised-up locutions. Sherr is especially wild during a passage where Davis gets randy with Howard Hughes.” Full Review

Chicago Reader

for a previous production "So what if Dinelaris overstates the case for the Estefans as pioneers, ignoring Latino predecessors as various as Desi Arnaz and Carlos Santana? Exaggeration spices up the narrative. 'On Your Feet' will no doubt do very well. But it lost me at about the 50-minute mark, when the Estefans confront what can only be characterized as a dirty little Jew of an A&R man. The spectacle of Emilio lecturing this Yiddish-spouting buffoon on what it means to be an outsider in America is beyond ironic." Full Review

The Qualms
Midtown W
Chicago Reader

for a previous production "It's pretty delicious—and not in Norris's typically cruel way. With 'The Qualms' he begins to look like the most Wildean satirist maybe since Wilde, taking obvious pleasure not just in skewering social types and ideas but in treating them almost—almost—sympathetically, as manifestations of a flawed and very amusing humanity." Full Review

Daddy Long Legs
Midtown W
Chicago Reader

for a previous production "This musical is sweet, charming, and just a wee bit dull, with an overlong first act, songs that lack dynamic variety, and a clear predilection for skating over the class issues it sets up. Still, when I consider what a miserable can of worms would be opened up by a more realistic treatment, I figure a little smooth skating may not be a bad idea." Full Review