Vinson Cunningham

Vinson Cunningham is a critic with New Yorker. This account has been auto-generated, and does not indicate that this person is an active member of Show-Score.com. That said, if you "follow" this member, you will automatically be updated whenever s/he writes a new review.

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Reviews (11)
New Yorker

"A Play About the Nuances of Conservatism in the Trump Era A group of friends grapple with ideologies in Will Arbery’s 'Heroes of the Fourth Turning,' at Playwrights Horizons." Full Review

The Rolling Stone
Upper W Side
New Yorker

"Morals and Monologues in 'The Rolling Stone' and 'Mojada.' New plays by Chris Urch and Luis Alfaro center on a gay man in Uganda and a Mexican immigrant in Queens, each facing dangers." Full Review

Slave Play
East Village
New Yorker

“The play acts like a whittling knife, refining and clarifying as it cuts. The first act is broad and impressionistic, and each of the next two sections is more realistic and denser with psychic danger than the last...What ensues is not only a deft exploration of what happens when love and power collide but also an excavation of a newly common kind of political-academic talk...Harris shows how the language of critical theory and that of Freudian talk therapy have come to echo each other." Full Review

King Kong (NYC)
Midtown W
New Yorker

“Kong is the show’s true star. He’s huge, muscular, and bottomlessly dark—all black and gray. His hands and feet are operated, in minutest detail, by a small, dancerly army, and his face moves via uncannily precise—and, I’ll admit, touching...There aren’t any instantly classic songs in the show, which makes it unlikely to be a long-lasting item of interest, but it’s fun simply because of Kong’s presence. The audience laughed and gasped...We whooped when he stood to his full height." Full Review

New Yorker

"Gladys is so much the object of our interest that a tendril of plot about real estate—the landlord wants the gallery gone—feels tacked on, and better forgotten. More fruitful is the chorus of talk that surrounds Gladys...'Waverly' will not be remembered as one of Lonergan’s major works, but this production, directed by Lila Neugebauer, showcases his great and singular talent for splitting open brisk, bookish people like these." Full Review

New Yorker

"McPherson attempts to surround several of Dylan’s tunes with a frame vague enough to contain their poetry and broad enough to relate their social truths...A show that fully accepted the challenge of Dylan’s elusive balance between unstable consciousness and tough social fact might have told more of its story through the lives of these two women...A different setting in time might have helped as well...McPherson offers up plenty of people...but never a voice, or a mind, like Dylan’s." Full Review

New Yorker

"Jake Gyllenhaal and Tom Sturridge take pains to dredge up feelings of audience profundity, and the Public presents a colorful new rendition at Shakespeare in the Park." Full Review

Mojada
East Village
New Yorker

"Morals and Monologues in 'The Rolling Stone' and 'Mojada.' New plays by Chris Urch and Luis Alfaro center on a gay man in Uganda and a Mexican immigrant in Queens, each facing dangers." Full Review

New Yorker

"The drama has been reworked so that the court case against Robinson is the frame for the whole play...The wrinkle is that Sorkin is very obviously worried about Trump, and about what the current political dispensation means for white folks of all political and ethical stripes...’To Kill a Mockingbird’ is a showcase for the competing liberal views of the races, depicting them in a kind of tortured but ever-improving dance.” Full Review

New Yorker

"“It’s hard—and, given the volume of choices, maybe ultimately impossible—to isolate the worst aspect of ‘American Son’…There’s the stilted, bulky dialogue, through which the characters deliver loads of exposition...Nobody says anything interesting, or funny, or surprising. The acting is even less flavorful, probably as a result of the deficient script...But what struck me as frankly offensive about 'American Son' was its treatment of the son, Jamal, who never appears onstage.” Full Review

The Ferryman (NYC)
Midtown W
New Yorker

"Because of its length—more than three hours—the play feels epic, but the actual plot is fairly simple. Most of the time is spent in the presence of the family as they go about their business, until, suddenly, the business becomes impossible to do. Part of the art here is in how the everyday turns sinister...Death and politics are always coming for you, Butterworth’s play seems to say." Full Review