Zac Thompson

Zac Thompson is a critic with Village Voice. This account has been auto-generated, and does not indicate that this person is an active member of Show-Score.com. That said, if you "follow" this member, you will automatically be updated whenever s/he writes a new review.

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Reviews (9)
55
Village Voice

"Warm yet almost entirely oomph-free new musical...It's not that Schulman needs to supply soap opera twists and huge reveals. But if these are the secrets, sins, and disappointments, we should feel their impact. Instead, Schulman seems eager to assure us at every turn that these are decent, diligent folk, all things considered...Adding to the show's too-safe feeling are the subdued performances in Rouse's staging and the determinedly inoffensive nature of Roberts's score." Full Review

80
Village Voice

“An intriguing new comedy…Ruhl's comic yet earnest mix of contemporary fact and timeless fantasy is matched by Taichman's buoyant staging and grounded by Tomei's warm and yearning George. As presented here, polyamory complicates things (think of the logistics!) but also satisfies the human animal's omnivorous nature and spiritual longing to be part of something bigger. Striving for transcendence, George discovers that magic and meaning were in the neighborhood all along.” Full Review

40
Village Voice

"The narrative jumps around in time, as if on shuffle or told through an addled memory...Donahue's staging has a similar sketched-in aspect...Neither character emerges as distinct, largely because, for all their disagreements, they sound so much alike...Despite Urie's fidgety charisma and the emotional openness De Jesús offers, there's something arch and artificial about Seavey's refusal to portray the more quiet, everyday moments that characterize a long-term romance." Full Review

35
Village Voice

“While telling their story, the players pause occasionally for a labor-anthem sing-along or to explain obsolete concepts. This device also allows Einhorn to insert some ambivalence about London's blithe embrace of violence...The script's reliance on hectoring speeches, manifesto-thin characterization, and narration in lieu of rousing action ultimately make for an inert production. As with London's book, it demonstrates how something can be red and colorless at the same time.” Full Review

75
Village Voice

"A tough but tender ninety-minute drama…Adams, a first-time playwright, has a tendency to lapse into therapeutic cliché and implausible avowals…Those late missteps detract from the otherwise sensitive treatment of the trio by both Adams and the cast of Jay Stull's slow-burn staging…Geraghty's Jamie in particular conveys a quietly shattering sense of being shell-shocked by her self-inflicted pain." Full Review

80
Village Voice

"As genial as a hootenanny, yet creator Lutken and his collaborators never water down Guthrie’s politics or get sentimental...Nor do Lutken and company strain to emphasize contemporary resonances...Director Corley and the cast certainly make Guthrie’s standpoint look and sound appealing...But the script remains too cursory to convey much of the man’s psychological landscape...Thanks to the music, however, the social fabric comes across in all its exhilarating, exasperating fullness." Full Review

90
Village Voice

“A muscular, visually astonishing production…Bold gestures help the production transcend what seems at first a simple agitprop premise, becoming something unruly and unreal. The searching, restless fury in Cannavale's knockabout performance likewise pushes the production past an exercise in raising class consciousness…Aided by O'Neill's relentless truth-telling and Jones's gritty visual poetry, Yank's hopeless struggle comes off as a Job-like plight of unusual urgency." Full Review

80
Village Voice

"The springiness in the script is enhanced by May Adrales's vivid staging, which features confessional rap interludes, a hallucinatory fight sequence, and graphic-novel-like projections designed by Jared Mezzocchi...It's funny, it flips the script on a very real language barrier, and it centralizes Vietnamese characters in a story about the Vietnam War (for once). In doing so, it reminds us of the human stories behind our own era's displaced." Full Review

80
Village Voice

"With so many familiar types arguing that they're misunderstood the show sometimes feels like a reunion of 'The Breakfast Club.' The results are rarely whiny and often moving, however, thanks to the emotional sincerity of the performances in Padraic Lillis's sensitive production. Joy likewise undercuts the self-pity with flashes of jagged wit and a sobering sense that at some fundamental level we remain unknowable to those we love, and even to ourselves." Full Review