Already closed | 1h 20m | Brooklyn

The Making of King Kong

From 3 member  reviews
Members say: Ambitious, Clever, Funny, Confusing, Quirky

About the show

Target Margin's world premiere is a subversive dark comedy that reimagines the making of the classic 1933 film King Kong. More…

"The Making of King Kong" is a theatrical journey into the cultural monster behind the myth. The play takes a brutal look at America’s history of white patriarchy, imperialism, and sexism through the eyes of original King Kong creators Merian C. Cooper and Ernest B. Schoedsack, and Hollywood starlet Fay Wray.

1h 20m | Already closed | The DOXSEE (Brooklyn)

Member Reviews (3)

MEMBERS SAY:

Ambitious, Clever, Funny, Confusing, Quirky

70
Clever, Entertaining, Funny

See it if you love any of the actors

Don't see it if if you get offended easily


December 4th, 2018
"All of the gender and racial ickiness of the film is brought to the fore...Pope does a terrific job of keeping the satire afloat..Her mockery, deeply sincere, allows the character to comment on gender and racial stereotypes while indulging them for comedy. 'King Kong' lacks that tonal control......
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December 6th, 2018
"'The Making of King Kong' has an editing problem...The ragged edges provides some immediate pleasures...But silliness isn’t the only thing that Clair and her director, Eugene Ma, are going for...The shift in attention from Kong to the White Yoga Ladies is a big, confident gesture that hasn’t qui...
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December 4th, 2018
“A ‘fantasia’ of a play that interrogates the original film through a feminist, intersectional lens...Clair’s play has the exuberant, outsider feeling of a graduate school thesis project, bursting with intelligent ideas, surprises at every turn, and playful experimentation with form that make it ...
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December 11th, 2018
“An ambitious piece...There are shining moments, and some major talent...As the play moves forward...The social commentary becomes heavy-handed to the point that it is difficult to see the play around it...The overt bludgeoning of the central theme becomes tedious...The aesthetic and conceit of t...
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