Closed 1h 30m
Hatef**k
Upper W Side
72

Hatef**k NYC Reviews and Tickets

72%
(38 Reviews)
Positive
74%
Mixed
21%
Negative
5%
Members say
Thought-provoking, Relevant, Absorbing, Disappointing, Great acting

About the Show

WP Theater teams up with Colt Coeur to present this world premiere, a thornily clever antidote to a “meet-cute” romance where conflicting cultural identities collide.

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Member Reviews (38)

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80
Relevant, Thought-provoking, Argumentative, Sexy

See it if Sexy academic idealistic muslim gal seduces sexy commercial egotistic muslim guy. Sparks fly. Can they grow from their differences?

Don't see it if Their antagonism hardly ever abates. They state their respective values on the portrayal of Muslims in western media, then keep arguing.

70
Impassioned, Platitudinous, Relevant, Preachy, Disappointing

See it if you want to see a libidinous & fervid debate on the image of Muslims in art & popular culture between a pop-fiction writer & a college prof.

Don't see it if you want more from an "issues play" than mere mouthpieces for competing viewpoints on a writer's responsibility to represent his/her culture

Critic Reviews (11)

March 13th, 2019

“Smart, sexy and not entirely satisfying....Ms. Mirza is a sharp writer and a savvy thinker...But too often Layla and Imran feel like mouthpieces for the larger arguments. When the actors really sell the repartee, those mouths can be enough...As the badinage sputters, though, the play wilts...Still, it’s nice to see a play that invites Muslim characters to be just as mouthy and sexy and messy as characters of any other denomination.”
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March 14th, 2019

"Layla and Imran’s hookup-turned-romance is fun to watch. But ultimately, 'Hatef**k' is another example of a genre that has become too familiar: The 'play about art,' in which well-educated people debate the role and responsibility of the artist in society. Granted, it’s an important debate, especially when the artist is a member of an often-stigmatized group. But one can’t help feeling that, like Imran and Layla, the play is using that issue to avoid some deeper and messier questions."
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March 13th, 2019

"Ladnier and Ramamurthy wield Mirza's sharp writing like two Olympic fencers brandishing their foils. They begin to stumble over their lines, however, as the plot progresses and Mirza becomes bogged down in the play's real purpose: an argument over the representation of Muslims in popular culture...The play is half-salvaged by Adrienne Campbell-Holt's steamy staging, which emphasizes the raw sexuality of the two performers."
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March 14th, 2019

"There’s stinging dialogue, solid construction and high powers of observation that accurately render the fractious literary milieu...The characters are impeccably detailed and behave so realistically, causing the possible dynamic for the viewer of siding with one over the other...Director Adrienne Campbell-Holt’s propulsive staging injects eroticism, clarity and focus, all at a brisk pace, unifying the play’s suspenseful elements with its eloquent rhetorical portions."
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March 13th, 2019

"Adrienne Campbell-Holt directs this non-stop verbal and emotional battle with finesse. Kavi Ladnier and Sendhil Ramamurthy are superb in their constantly guarded love-hating. I am in awe of their efforts in this play, which is such a nuanced look at living in America while Muslim. This is an excellent co-production of Colt Coeur and WP Theater."
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March 13th, 2019

"A well-crafted two-hander in any season...Passions are heightened with every clever turn-of-phrase until the two head for the bedroom to work off the steam...Mirza's dialogue ripples with energy sprinkled with humor and an occasional gut punch. Using her two beautifully defined creations, she can go deep as well as broad, coming to conclusions that are enlightening as well as troubling...Director Adrienne Campbell-Holt has been blessed with a terrific cast as well as script."
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March 14th, 2019

"The play is solid, but I think Adrienne Campbell-Holt’s direction could have more nuance. High pitched antagonism is not sufficiently interesting a dynamic to keep an audience going for 90 minutes. At some point you realize nothing is ever going to change...I also think the writing bears a bit of scrutiny, to make the piece less a polemic and focus more on the actual relationship – however flawed – these two people are allegedly trying to create."
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March 15th, 2019

"The strains of rom com and intellectual rigor...don’t always harmonize, and sometimes the schematics of the philosophical argument trip up the piece as much as the schematics of the romance plot, but it’s bracing and engaging throughout, energized by two strong performers with chemistry to spare...The play’s laser focus is both weakness and strength...The absence of exposition is bright and refreshing, but we end up knowing almost nothing about these people."
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T
March 15th, 2019

"For every line that surprises in 'Hatef**k,' there are ten riddled with clichés, lecturing, or banalities...The dialogue is painfully forced and often as implausible as the story arc...As it stands now, 'Hatef**k' is just another play about opposites, this time with a Muslim twist. The topic is admirable and relevant but that doesn’t make the play a good one...When the play ended, I was not sure either character grew or learned anything. I know I didn’t."
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March 14th, 2019

"'Hatef**k' crackles and sizzles with passioned arguments over a sincere question: do POC’s have to sell out to earn big?...In some ways, the viewer is led to empathize with Imran, and how stuck he feels at having access to privilege only if he plays up every image and motivation sparked by imposing prejudices. Both actors make their characters fiery and intelligent...The couple bicker and blush in love and hate for themselves, each other, and the world."
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N
March 13th, 2019

"The formula is the same as the Carville-Matalin script: opposites attract, at the risk of implosion...At the core of the smartly, and wittily written play, is the consummate art of peddling of popular notion and stereotype literature to the masses. The idea of being perceived shallow is tucked away, but hovers about...Mirza raises the interesting and important question of Muslim identity and stereotype."
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