The Way We Get By
Closed 1h 20m
The Way We Get By
74

The Way We Get By NYC Reviews and Tickets

74%
(18 Reviews)
Positive
61%
Mixed
39%
Negative
0%
Members say
Clever, Entertaining, Delightful, Absorbing, Funny

About the Show

Amanda Seyfried makes her NYC stage debut at Second Stage in a world premiere by Neil LaBute, about a one night stand between two guests at a wedding.

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Member Reviews (18)

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65
Entertaining, Confusing, Disappointing

See it if you like the actors. It's entertaining but not great. It's not painful...

Don't see it if you expect a thrilling plot.

69
Disappointing, Mediocre

See it if You like shows about relationships that have both comedic and dramatic moments or if you're a fan of Niel Labute.

Don't see it if You don't like 2 person shows or are expecting much from it. The show is nice, at times its a bit slow, the twist was a bit of a let down

Critic Reviews (19)

The New York Times
May 19th, 2015

"Slight but spirited...There are several good reasons to see the show (it’s short, it’s sexy, it’s starry, it’s well acted) and others not to (it’s contrived, it’s manipulative and even at 70 minutes, too long for its limited purposes). Your call."
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Time Out New York
May 19th, 2015

"Most of the play consists of loud bickering and small-talk filler. This is meant to suggest a morning-after dance of negotiations, but while it’s nice to see LaBute working in a less misanthropic mode than usual, the characters are drawn too sketchily to support it, and the actors have little chemistry... Even as LaBute fills in their history, their present stays flat. The play is a glazy cruller: one big twist with a hole in the middle."
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New York Magazine / Vulture
May 19th, 2015

"Neil LaBute’s latest disappointing mousetrap...I felt just like Doug for much of the play: So tell me then. Come on. Please. And yet, when LaBute responded to my mute screams, I quickly began to wish he hadn’t. If the setup were monumentally entertaining and the payoff profoundly engrossing, a trick like this might work, but the setup here is barely bearable. The payoff is nonexistent. Or rather, it is trite, a perfunctory wave at carpe diem."
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The Hollywood Reporter
May 19th, 2015

"LaBute doesn't develop his provocative premise in particularly interesting fashion. Much of the dialogue about the couple's concern over reactions of their friends and family should they decide to take the relationship further proves banal and repetitive. Still, the playwright's gift for amusing banter is very much on display, garnering more than a few laughs with running gags...A feel-good, happy ending that at least doesn't send us out with a sour taste in our mouths."
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Entertainment Weekly
May 19th, 2015

"The writer who has been called 'America’s misanthrope par excellence' appears to have had a change of heart when it comes to matters of the same organ. 'The Way We Get By' feels like a refreshingly sunnier and more hopeful LaBute, with moments that feel suspiciously like giddy joy."
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New York Post
May 19th, 2015

"A bigger issue is how annoying they are...The show, ably directed by Leigh Silverman, hinges on whether Beth and Doug will decide to grow up — and whether they’ll do it together. The only thing for sure is that they’re likely to keep yammering on."
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New York Daily News
May 19th, 2015

"LaBute, the master of corrosive misoygny, has become a sweet fool for love. Tentative embraces and pussyfooted retreats underscore the rom-com textures. Then, at the one-hour mark in this 85-minute Second Stage production, reality bites. He’s up to up to his time-tested switcheroos. It also sinks the show."
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AM New York
May 19th, 2015

"There is a plot twist which reveals that their relationship is actually quite complicated, but it adds little to this 90-minute play, which has all the sustenance of 90 empty calories. It appears as if LaBute intended it to serve as the template for a meandering discussion about sex and societal expectations...Under Leigh Silverman's direction, Sadoski and Seyfried deliver over-the-top performances that reflect the one-dimensional natures of their characters."
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Theatermania
May 19th, 2015

"Breathing with a newfound fullness, the slight comedy suddenly takes on a more robust presence as the passive what are we now? conversation subtly veers into an elegy for the elusive choice to be happy. It's a decision we are all often too scared to make, but in a turn of romantic optimism, LaBute proposes that just maybe one earth-shaking evening in a Manhattan high-rise with the right person can inspire a change of both heart and nerve — cultural norms be damned."
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CurtainUp
May 18th, 2015

"The production values are typically top notch as everything at Second Stage tends to be. Director Leigh Silverman sees to it that there's as much movement as possible in this talky play that can't avoid having the actors too often standing and facing each other. And Mr. La Bute proves that beneath all that darkness, beats the heart of genuine romantic."
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The Guardian (UK)
May 20th, 2015

"This two-character drama, set the morning after the night before, has perhaps 10 minutes of substantive conversation — some of it about Smartwater...Would it kill these people to say what they mean? Fluently? Efficiently...how much can you do with a play this middling, this contentless? The comedy isn’t as miserabilist as some of LaBute’s work, but it is insipid and trivial. As Beth might say, it’s kinda like whatever."
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New York Theatre Guide
May 20th, 2015

"As in other LaBute stories, these characters arrive fully formed and ready for full frontal heart to heart combat. Over the course of 80 or so minutes that fly by, LaBute turns up the temperature incrementally. He gives his characters time to listen, parry, act and react. He gives us time to be drawn into the basement of their story – which is where we want to be...And it is totally worth the watch. Bravo."
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USA Today
May 19th, 2015

"'Get By' can be slow going...Their inability to communicate, while funny in spurts, threatens to grow tiresome...This being a LaBute play, the characters inevitably become more blunt and biting as they struggle to connect. And, as usual, the playwright has something bigger in mind than the ways in which men and women hurt each other."
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Newsday
May 19th, 2015

"What we cannot guess, however, is how viscerally romantic, how almost shockingly sensitive, even, dare we say it, sweet, the next 85 minutes will turn out to be. Suffice it to say that the fling between Doug and Beth will have complications in the hours before dawn and that - LaBute being LaBute - hurtfulness will be part of the surprise...For LaBute, dares here to explore less obviously explosive territory. Yet, somehow, this daring feels deep."
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NorthJersey.com
May 21st, 2015

"The beguiling comedy takes place in the wee hours of the morning, after Beth and Doug, two attractive people of around 30, have had sex for the first time.'The Way We Get By' is a tightly focused, slender piece, with just the two characters. But the actors make it a very appealing journey...The evening offers evidence that people can change radically: I never thought I'd see the play in which Neil LaBute comes down on the side of Cupid."
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The Associated Press
May 19th, 2015

"Mining the comedy in an awkward morning-after situation between a hung-over young man and woman, who apparently fell into bed together after a wild wedding reception, would seem like a natural for acerbic playwright Neil LaBute. Yet his new comedy, 'The Way We Get By' has an unexpected sweetness, along with a twist that heightens the suspense as to whether the couple in question will embark on a romance or not."
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StageZine
May 19th, 2015

"Leigh Silverman directs both actors with precision, helping them extract the sincerity and poignancy of one of Neil LaBute’s most simplistic and best works ever."
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As Her World Turns
June 29th, 2015

"I’ve never seen a Neil LaBute play until now...Slowly (perhaps too slowly) layers of their backstory are revealed and we find out just why Thomas’s character is so reluctant to jump into a relationship with someone who is clearly the woman of his dreams. Their love story is most unusual (no spoilers here), and that twist makes this play slightly more intriguing than a typical romance with complications."
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Financial Times (UK)
May 20th, 2015

"Beth and Doug’s halting conversation drains away interest as fast as Doug drains that bottle of water. But narrative intrigue is replenished by the revelation that the two in fact know each other from years before. How they reconnect after belatedly acknowledging that fact brings this 85-minute evening to its conclusion."
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