Little Scratch
Starts Apr 2023 1h 35m
Little Scratch
89

Little Scratch London Reviews and Tickets

89%
(1 Review)
Positive
100%
Mixed
0%
Negative
0%
Members say
Absorbing, Ambitious, Clever, Intelligent, Great writing

About the Show

The stage adaptation of Rebecca Watson's debut novel about a woman facing an all-consuming trauma.

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Member Reviews (1)

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21 Reviews | 0 Followers
89
Intelligent, Great writing, Clever, Absorbing, Ambitious

See it if You loved the book; you like new, experimental theatre; you like plays that make you think

Don't see it if You're triggered by sexual assault, or you prefer more conventional theatre

Critic Reviews (5)

Time Out London
November 12th, 2021
For a previous production

[The actors] throw themselves into the role emotionally, but don’t do a lot of body acting ... It would work almost as well on radio ... 'Little Scratch’ is a virtuoso articulation of a remarkable piece of writing.
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The London Evening Standard
November 12th, 2021
For a previous production

The attempt to bring that unnerving lack of quietness to the stage is strangely comforting. Amidst the cacophony, there’s an illuminating and unusual sense of beauty.
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The Arts Desk
November 15th, 2021
For a previous production

To tackle a formally bold novel, Rebecca Watson’s recent little scratch, Mitchell and her adaptor, Miriam Battye, have fashioned something equally inventive that works perfectly in the small Downstairs space at the Hampstead.
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The Guardian (UK)
November 12th, 2021
For a previous production

Played without an interval, these 100 minutes don’t quite match the propulsion of the novel, but the staging finds its own careful balance of airy exuberance and intense anger, and it carries the same lingering power.
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The Stage (UK)
November 12th, 2021
For a previous production

[little scratch] ably and thoughtfully explores the reality of survivors of trauma. The play ends on an ambiguous note, but the lack of resolution doesn’t feel frustrating – instead, it feels true and intimate.
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