White Noise (Bridge Theatre)
White Noise (Bridge Theatre)

White Noise (Bridge Theatre) London Reviews and Tickets

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Four close friends find themselves connected to a shocking incident of racially motivated violence.

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Critic Reviews (9)

Time Out London
October 13th, 2021

It’s thorny and thoughtful, not nihilistic but possessed of a morbid fascination for the society it is dissecting. It’s also finely acted...
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The London Evening Standard
October 14th, 2021

The pace of Polly Findlay’s production ... is an icy determination to make us acknowledge our darkest thoughts and question our belief that we are among “the good guys”. I found Parks’s argument about colonialism’s evil legacy convincing, the expression of it less so.
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The Guardian (UK)
October 13th, 2021

But even when neither the story nor the characters are believable, this is still a propulsive drama with pace, plotting and a deadly magnetism, and its greatest triumph lies in the virtuosity and vigour of its astonishing cast.
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WhatsOnStage
October 13th, 2021

Polly Findlay's taut production speeds through its almost three hours with control and concentration. There's an awful lot to pack in and some of the plot developments...stretch credulity. But the propulsion of the ideas is strong and devastating.
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The Times (UK)
October 13th, 2021

Polly Findlay’s production coats the play’s absurdist tendencies with a veneer of metropolitan gloss. Lizzie Clachan’s revolving set delivers urban chic, and the actors fire their lines at each other with panache. The problem remains that the characters are never more than two-dimensional.
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The Arts Desk
October 15th, 2021

Instead, as Parks's cunning title suggests, the play refracts race, and racism, through the dynamics of the quartet on view - each of which consists of a white and a black partner...
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The Stage (UK)
October 13th, 2021

It’s an intentionally provocative play that coats its ugly premise with wit and words. The production feels almost too polished at times, but no less powerful for it.
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The Independent (UK)
October 22nd, 2021

Parks’s play is undercut with a fatalism about a culturally required wokeness that only goes surface-deep ... It’s grim, brilliantly perceptive, and lets no one off the hook.
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